Professional Association of Diving Instructors (PADI)


Coral Edge Adventures offers PADI Open Water Scuba Diver Course for $490
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About PADI

PADI:  Professional Association of Diving Instructors

Welcome to the World of Scuba Diving.  PADI is the world’s leading scuba diving training organization.With more than forty years of experience, over 136,000 PADI Professionals and more than 6200 dive shops and resorts worldwide, PADI training materials and services let you experience scuba diving from nearly anywhere.



 PADI Scuba Certification Courses

Go Dive! Choose from a wide range of PADI scuba certification courses with flexible study options including online courses to accommodate your busy schedule.  As a PADI Diver, you carry the most respected and sought after scuba credentials in the world. No matter where you choose to dive, your PADI certification card will be recognized and accepted.

Get Introduced

Get Certified

Improve Your Skills

Be a Safer Diver. Be Prepared

Taste the Fun and Adventure

Technical Courses

Professional Courses
Become a PADI Pro

Teach Scuba

Teach Technical Diving

Teach Professional Instructor Training

Teach CPR and First Aid

 

 Discover Scuba Diving

PADI Discover Scuba® Diving Experience

Have you ever wondered what it’s like to breathe underwater. If you want to find out but aren’t quite ready to take the plunge into a certification course, Discover Scuba Diving will let you try scuba to see if you like it. Most PADI dive shops offer a version of this program, either in a pool or other body of water. You might try it close to home or while you’re on vacation.
While not an actual scuba certification, during the Discover Scuba Diving experience you’ll learn how to use scuba equipment in shallow water and get a quick and easy introduction to what it takes to explore the underwater world.

The Fun Part

There is nothing like breathing underwater for the very first time. It takes a little getting used to –after all, human beings weren’t designed to do that – but after a few minutes of awestruck wonder, most participants realize how easy scuba diving really is. The biggest challenge instructors have with the Discover Scuba Diving program is not coaxing participants into the water, but coaxing them out when the program is over. The fun part? It’s all fun!

  • Plus, you can get credit! If your Discover Scuba Diving program includes an actual scuba dive in open water, your experience may count toward PADI Scuba Diver or Open Water Diver certification, putting you a step ahead of the game when you decide to go for it.

What You Learn

You learn the basics you need to dive under the direct supervision of a PADI Professional. One thing you’ll learn is that you really can breathe underwater and whether you like doing that or not. You will: 

  • Learn what wearing scuba equipment feels like and how easy it is to move around underwater while wearing it
  • Find out what it’s like to breathe underwater and learn whether you can be comfortable there
  • Learn some basic skills and safety rules that will carry over to your full scuba certification course when you take the next step

The Scuba Gear You Use

All the equipment you will need is typically included in a Discover Scuba Diving experience. You’ll use all the basic scuba gear including a mask , snorkel and fins, a buoyancy compensating jacket that also carries your scuba tank, a scuba regulator to breathe from and instrumentation to monitor depth and air supply. You might also wear a scuba wetsuit or a weight system depending on where you do your Discover Scuba Diving program.
Ask the dive shop where you plan to take your Discover Scuba Diving program about the scuba equipment you’ll use.

The Learning Materials You Need

  • Just your willingness and undivided attention

Prerequisites

  • To take Discover Scuba Diving, you must be:
    At least 10 years old

Your Next Adventure

Once you complete a Discover Scuba Diving program, you’ll want to check out:
Scuba Diver and Open Water Diver certification courses.

Visit Coral Edge Adventures today to enroll in our next Discover Scuba Diving course.
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 Bubblemaker 8 yrs+

The PADI Bubblemaker Experience

What a great way to introduce children to scuba diving in a pool in less than six feet of water. Celebrate a birthday by throwing a memorable, exciting Bubblemaker party with friends and family at your local PADI dive shop or resort. It’s fun, easy and safe.

The Fun Part

Youngsters can join in the family fun of scuba diving or even start a trend! Children should be comfortable in the water, but they don’t have to be super swimmers. With youngsters in mind, the maximum depth is only 2 metres/ 6 feet.

  • Typical sessions last about an hour (sign up, gear up and fun included)
  • Also available as a confined open water experience (2 metres/ 6 feet max. depth)

What You Learn

Kids get a chance to :

  • Experience what scuba diving is like under the direct care and supervision of PADI Instructors
  • Take their first breath underwater
  • Learn about and use scuba diving equipment made for children – not adults

The Scuba Gear You Use

Children use all the basic scuba gear, which is made for their size and stature.

Check with your local dive shop about setting up a Bubblemaker experience today. 

The Learning Materials You Need

Ready to blow bubbles? The Bubblemaker crewpak gives kids a memento of their visit to the underwater world and is full of fun surprises. The pack includes: a kid-sized beach towel, log book, certificate, temporary tattoo emblem and the adorable and a popular Bubblemaker “action figure.” Adults love them, too.

Visit Coral Edge Adventures today to purchase these products.

Prerequisites

The PADI Bubblemaker program is for children age 8 and above.

  • No pre-training required

Your Next Adventure

Bubblemakers can continue the adventure to complete AquaMissions during the Seal Team program. Those who are 10-14 years old can take the Junior PADI Open Water Diver course and may want to pursue other advanced kids courses.

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 Seal Team (8 yrs+)

The PADI Seal Team Program

The PADI Seal Team is for young divers who are looking for action-packed fun in a pool by doing exciting scuba AquaMissions.

Have you ever wondered what it's like to dive with flashlights, take digital pictures underwater or float effortlessly like an astronaut? These are AquaMissions that introduce you to wreck, navigation, buoyancy, underwater photography, environmental awareness and more.

Here's your chance to do some cool stuff in the pool, meet friends and share in the adventure of the underwater world.

The Fun Part

The best part of the Specialty AquaMissions is they reinforce safe diving skills while the kids are having fun. PADI Seals get to sample a wide variety of dives.

In addition, it provides parents with a structured program that lets their children develop skills, learn about the aquatic environment and have a lot of good, clean fun. This is also an excellent way to introduce kids to scuba diving prior to full Open Water Diver certification.

What You Learn

The PADI Seal Team program is broken into two parts.

Part one, AquaMissions 1 - 5, teaches kids the basics of diving - things like buoyancy control, mask clearing, regulator recovery, etc.

After building a solid foundation of scuba skills, kids move on to part two. Part two is full of specialty AquaMissions, which usually last about an hour.

PADI Seal Team

  • Helps children learn responsibility
  • Teaches children about the aquatic environment
  • Is a fun pool-only experience
  • Is conducted by certified, trained PADI Professionals

The Scuba Gear You Use

Children use all the basic scuba gear, which is made for their size and stature.

Check with your local dive shopabout gear rentals and packages offered with this program. You can find most everything at the scuba diving shop

The Learning Materials You Need

Calling all Seal Team recruits: The Seal Team crewpak includes everything a PADI Seal Team member needs to prepare for their AquaMissions. Video on DVD? Check! Activity book? Check! Log book pages? Check!  You are now cleared for an underwater adventure . . .

Visit Coral Edge Adventures today to purchase these products.

Prerequisites

To participate in PADI Seal Team, a child

  • Must be at least 8 years old

Your Next Adventure

Upon successful completion of the first five AquaMissions, students become PADI Seal Team members. Upon successful completion of 10 additional specialty Aqua Missions, students become Master Seal Team members

When kids are 10 years old, they can take complete the Junior PADI Open Water Diver certification.

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 The PADI Skin Diver Course

Learn to snorkel and skin dive!

Explore the underwater world from the surface.

The PADI Skin Diver certification helps you get - and keep - your fins wet. While snorkeling is limited to peering down from the surface, skin divers generally venture further than snorkelers, making frequent surface dives to interact with aquatic life, up close and personal.

What You Learn
The course provides basic information on skin diving equipment, dive science, the environment, problem management and safe skin diving practices.

Inwater training includes various techniques for donning and adjusting equipment, entering the water, checking buoyancy, surface swimming, clearing water from your snorkel and performing effortless surface dives.

Prerequisites
To enroll in the PADI Skin Diver course, you must be

  • at least eight years old
  • comfortable in the water.

The Fun Part
The best part is learning to use your mask, fins and snorkel so you don't miss a moment of underwater action. Whether you're looking at your local freshwater lake or the big blue ocean, you’ll have a new perspective on just about every body of water. You can use your new aquatic skills to explore a brand new world during an optional open water dive. And, when you’ve finished the course, you’ll get a PADI Skin Diver certification card for your efforts and be ready for your next adventure.

The Gear You Use
The PADI Skin Diver course teaches you to use basic snorkeling equipment including a mask, snorkel, fins, buoyancy control device (BCD), exposure protection like a wet suit and dive weights as needed. 

Ask the team here at Coral Edge Adventures, your local PADI dive shop, what equipment you’ll use in the course. We’ll have everything you need readily available.

The Learning Materials You Need
The PADI Skin Diver course doesn't have any required materials, but you'll enjoy the PADI Discover the Underwater World video. The video covers all of the great reasons to jump in and includes tips that will come in handy once you hit the water. A companion piece is The Snorkeler’s Field Guide. This  handy booklet illustrattesvarious underwater environments along with their common aquatic life.

Visit Coral Edge Adventures today to purchase these products.

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 Open Water Diver

Get Certified!  Take a Scuba Lesson with the PADI Open Water Diver Course

Get your PADI scuba certification. If you’ve always wanted to learn how to scuba dive, discover new adventures or simply see the wondrous world beneath the waves, this is where it starts.

The PADI Open Water Diver course is the world’s most popular scuba course, and has introduced millions of people to the adventurous diving lifestyle. Start your scuba certification online.

What You Learn

The PADI Open Water Diver course consists of three main phases: 

  • Knowledge Development (online or in a classroom ) to understand basic principles of scuba diving
  • Confined Water Dives to learn basic scuba skills
  • Open Water Dives to review your skills and explore! 

If you’ve tried diving through a Discover Scuba Diving experience or resort course, the skills you learned may be credited towards a portion of the full PADI Open Water Diver course certification.

Prerequisites
To enroll in the PADI Open Diver course or Junior Open Water Diver course, you must 

  • Be 10 years or older (PADI eLearning requires an extra registration step for students under 13 years due to international internet laws

The Fun Part

The fun part about this course is . . . well, just about all of it because learning to dive is incredible. You breathe underwater for the first time (something you’ll never forget) and learn what you need to know to become a certified diver. During the course, you’ll make at least five pool dives and four dives at local dive sites under the supervision of your PADI Instructor.

Get College Credit
You may be able to earn college credit for the PADI Open Water Diver course!

The Scuba Gear You Use

In the PADI Open Water Diver course, you learn to use basic scuba gear including a dive computer, and standard accessories. The equipment you wear varies somewhat, depending upon whether you’re diving in tropical, temperate or cold water

Check with Coral Edge Adventures, your local dive shop, about the gear you’ll use during this course. You can find most everything here at Coral Edge Adventures

The Learning Materials You Need

PADI offers a variety of home-study materials for the Open Water Diver course. While eLearning is the most convenient option, you may also chose a book and DVD package or a multimedia DVD-ROM.

PADI’s Open Water Diver materials cover what you need to know about basic scuba diving skills, terminology and safety procedures. For each concept you’ll read a description and watch a video demonstration. Then you’ll jump in the pool (or pool-like environment) to practice these skills with your instructor. Later, as a certified diver, use the course materials as a reference guide for future diving adventures and to review what you learned. 

Note: Enroll in the PADI Open Water Diver Course Online for immediate computer-based access to the manual and video integrated into seamless, guided online learning.

Visit Coral Edge Adventures today to enroll in our next Open Water Diver course, receive more information and  to purchase these products.

Start Now

You don’t have to wait to get going. With PADI eLearning and the PADI Open Water Diver Course Online, you can start right now. The PADI Open Water Diver Course Online lets you learn the background information you need before each dive at your own pace through friendly, interactive learning. It even helps you choose the PADI dive shop where you’ll make those dives.

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 Scuba Diver

PADI Scuba Diver Course

Short on time and long on the urge to become a certified diver? The PADI Scuba Diver certification might just be for you. This course requires less time than the PADI Open Water Diver course, covering only the first three of five sections of knowledge development, the first three of five pool sessions, and the first two of four open water training dives, resulting in a limited certification. Particularly if you expect to go scuba diving primarily in the company of a dive guide or if you have limited time to devote to scuba certification, consider becoming a PADI Scuba Diver.

This certification allows for ample dive experience and is a good warm-up for the Open Water Diver course, if that’s your ultimate goal. PADI Scuba Divers are qualified to:

  • Dive under the direct supervision of a PADI Divemaster, Assistant Instructor or Instructor to a maximum depth of 12 metres / 40 feet
  • Obtain air fills, rent or purchase scuba equipment and participate in other diving activities as long as they have the required supervision
  • Continue their dive training and complete PADI Open Water Diver certification and other courses such as Project AWARE and Equipment Specialty courses

The Fun Part

The Scuba Diver certification opens the door on the underwater world for anyone who’s thought that a course would take too long or be too difficult.

  • Complete your Open Water Diver whenever you want! Take your Scuba Diver certification to Open Water Diver with a few additional dives and knowledge development, and make the jump to Open Water Diver certification. You can start scuba diving independently whenever time allows or you’re up for more

What You Learn

All the basics of scuba diving through knowledge development, a set of scuba skills in the pool that you’ll use again during open water dives, and an appreciation for the underwater world that will keep you coming back for more bottom time every chance you get!

During the course you’ll cover material and practice skills related to topics such as:

  • Buoyancy skills including comfortable ascents and descents, and breathing underwater.
  • Staying warm underwater, streamlining your swimming skills and buddy diving techniques.
  • Diving environments and aquatic life you’re likely to encounter.
  • Preventing common problems underwater.
  • An introduction to boat diving. 

The Scuba Gear You Use

You’ll use all the basic scuba gear and some of it may be included with your course. You may want to invest in your own mask, snorkel and fins since these personal items are a lot more fun to use when they fit properly. A buoyancy compensating jacket that holds your scuba tank, a scuba regulator that delivers air, a weight system and instrumentation to monitor depth and air supply will also be used. Depending on the scuba diving environment, you might also wear a scuba wetsuit .

Check with Coral Edge Adventures, your local dive shop, about the gear you’ll use during this course. You can find most everything here at Coral Edge Adventures

The Learning Materials You Need

PADI offers a variety of home-study materials for the Scuba Diver. While eLearning is the most convenient option, you may also choose a book and video on DVD package or a multimedia DVD-ROM.

PADI’s Scuba Diver materials provide a comprehensive overview of basic scuba diving skills, terminology and safety procedures. For each concept you’ll read a description and watch a video demonstration. Then you’ll jump in the pool (or pool-like environment) to practice these skills with your instructor. Once you’re a certified diver, use the course materials as a reference guide for future diving adventures. 

Visit Coral Edge Adventures today to enroll in our next Scuba Diver course, receive more information and  to purchase these products.

The Prerequisites for This Course

To take this course, you must be:

  • 15 years old (or 10 years old for Junior Scuba Diver certification)

Your Next Adventure

You may want to step up to Open Water Diver certification at your first opportunity but as a PADI Scuba Diver you also qualify to take:

Equipment Specialist and Project AWARE Specialist certification courses.

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 Advanced Open Water Diver

PADI Advanced Open Water Diver Course


Exploration, Excitement, Experiences. They’re what the PADI Advanced Open Water Diver course is all about. And no, you don’t have to be “advanced” to take it – it’s designed so you can go straight into it after the PADI Open Water Diver course. The Advanced Open Water Diver course helps you increase your confidence and build your scuba skills so you can become more comfortable in the water. This is a great way to get more dives under your belt while continuing to learn under the supervision of your PADI Instructor. This course builds on what you’ve learned and develops new capabilities by introducing you to new activities and new ways to have fun scuba diving. 

  

You’ll hone your skills by completing five adventure dives that introduce you to:

  • Underwater navigation
  • Deeper water diving  (typically anywhere from 18-30 metres/ 60-100 feet)
  • A sampler of three more Adventure Dives of your choice   


The Fun Part: Your Choice
One reason you’ll love the Advanced Open Water Diver course is that you and your instructor choose from 15 types of Adventure Dives to complete your course. You can try your hand at digital underwater photographywreck diving, , diving with underwater scooters, peak performance buoyancy and much more.

  • Get credit! Each Adventure Dive in the PADI Advanced Open Water Diver course may credit toward the first dive of the corresponding PADI Specialty Diver course. 

Prerequisites
To take this course, you must be:

  • A PADI Open Water Diver  (or qualifying certification from another training organization)
  • 15 years old (12 for Junior Advanced Open Water Diver)

Start the Advanced Open Water Diver Course Online
PADI Advanced Open Water Diver course is part of PADI eLearning®. The Advanced Open Water Diver Course Online gets you started right now with the background information you need for the seven of the most popular Adventure Dives (though you and your instructor can still choose any of the Adventure Dives.)  Start Now!
  

What You Learn

The knowledge and skills you get in the Advanced Open Water Diver course vary with your interest and the adventures you have, but include

  • Practical aspects of deep diving
  • Physiological effects of deeper scuba diving.
  • More ways to use your underwater compass
  • How to navigate using kick-cycles, visual landmarks and time
  • How to better use your dive computer and electronic Recreational Dive PlannerTM (eRDPTM)
  • And much, much more, depending on the Adventure Dives you choose

Get College Credit
You may be able to earn college credit for the PADI Advanced Open Water Diver Course  

The Scuba Gear You Use
You use all the basic scuba gear  including your underwater compass. Depending on which three adventure dives you pick, you may also try out underwater photography equipment , DPVs (underwater scooters), a dive light a dry suit, lift bags, a dive flag/float or other specialty gear.

Check with your local dive shop about gear rentals and packages offered with this course. You can find most everything at the scuba diving shop.

The Learning Materials You Need
PADI’s Adventures in Diving Manual and DVD provide information on more than 16 types of specialty diving.You’ll use them as a guidebook to improve your diving skills and prepare for new experiences and adventures.

Curious about night diving? Flip to the night diving chapter. Once you’ve previewed the skills, your instructor will guide you on your first night diving adventure. Having trouble with underwater navigation? Review the underwater navigation section then sign up for the Navgation Adventure Dive with your PADI Instructor.

To purchase this product, contact your local PADI Instructor, dive shop or resort.

Your Next Adventure
After you’ve tried a specialty in the Advanced Open Water Diver course, you’ll probably want to take the whole course and learn more:altitude diving, AWARE-fish identification, boat diving, deep diving, diver propulsion vehicle use, drift diving, dry suit diving, multilevel and computer diving, night diving, peak performance buoyancy, search and recovery, underwater nature study, underwater navigation, underwater photography, underwater videography, wreck diving

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 Adventure Diver

The PADI Adventure Diver Course

The PADI Adventure Diver course helps you get more out of diving by introducing you to new types of scuba diving adventures. It’s a great opportunity to work with your instructor to build your scuba diving skills and gain more confidence.

The Fun Part

Have you always wanted to try digital underwater photography? How about wreck diving? Here's your chance because you can sample three dives of your choice, get a taste of what you like, and feel more at ease in the water, strengthening your underwater skills and letting you enjoy scuba diving more than ever.

  • Get credit! Each Adventure Dive may be credited toward the first dive of the corresponding PADI Specialty course. This means you can be well on your path to becoming a Master Scuba Diver.

What You Learn

You can choose what you’re most interested in learning. Need to work on your buoyancy skills? Try the Peak Performance Buoyancy Adventure Dive. Want to know what you’re looking at down there? Try the AWARE-Fish Identification Adventure Dive. Choose any three of the following Adventure Dives:

Adventure Dives available to scuba divers 10 years old and older:

  • Altitude Diver
  • AWARE-Fish Identification
  • Boat Diver
  • Digital Underwater Photography
  • Dry Suit Diver
  • Peak Performance Buoyancy
  • Underwater Naturalist
  • Underwater Navigator

Additional Adventure Dives available to scuba divers 12 years old and older:

  • Deep Diver
  • Diver Propulsion Vehicle
  • Drift Diver
  • Multilevel Diver
  • Night Diver
  • Search and Recovery Diver
  • Underwater Videography
  • Wreck Diver

The Scuba Gear You Use

You use all your basic scuba gear  including your underwater compass. Depending on which three adventure dives you pick, you may also try out underwater photography equipment , DPVs (underwater scooters), a dive light , a dry suit, lift bags, a dive flag/float or other specialty gear.

Check with your local dive shop about gear rentals and packages offered with this course. You can find most everything at your local dive shop.

The Learning Materials You Need

PADI’s Adventures in Diving Manual and video on DVD provide information on more than 16 types of specialty diving. You’ll use them as a guidebook to improve your diving skills and prepare for new experiences and adventures.

Curious about night diving? Flip to the night diving chapter. Once you’ve previewed the skills, your instructor will guide you on your first night diving adventure. Having trouble with underwater navigation? Review the underwater navigation section then sign up for the Underwater Navigation Adventure Dive with your PADI Instructor.

To purchase this product, contact your local PADI Instructor, dive shop or resort

Prerequisites

To take the Adventure Diver course, you must be

  • A PADI Open Water Diver or Junior Open Water Diver certification (or qualifying certification from another organization)
  • Minimum age: 15 years old (10 years old for PADI Junior Adventure Diver)

Your Next Adventure

After your PADI Adventure Diver certification you can take the next step by completing two more adventure dives. If you've completed five total adventure dives that include deep and navigation, you're an PADI Advanced Open Water Diver

PADI Adventure Dives can also count towards PADI Specialty Diver certifications. For example, if you liked your Night Adventure Dive so much that you wanted to take a complete PADI Night Diver Specialty course, your Night Adventure Dive can count as the first dive of that specialty.

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 Master Scuba Diver Rating

Sharpen Your Skills with the PADI Master Scuba DiverTM rating

You have the passion. You want to join the best of the best in recreational scuba diving. You want to live the dive lifestyle and explore the underwater world and go places and see things you have never experienced.

More than a pipe dream?

Absolutely! Do it by becoming a PADI Master Scuba Diver – a rating that puts you in a class of distinction – writing your ticket to endless adventure and opportunities through the experience and scuba training that sets you apart.

The Fun Part

With the PADI Master Scuba Diver rating, you have reached the highest non professional level in the PADI System of diver education. It means that you have acquired significant training and experience in a variety of dive environments. See all the specialty diver courses offered.
 

Prerequisites

  • 12 years old 
  • PADI Open Water Diver (or qualifying certification from another training organization)
  • PADI Advanced Open Water Diver (or qualifying certification from another training organization)
  • PADI Rescue Diver or Junior Rescue Diver (or qualifying certification from another training organization)
  • Minimum of five PADI Specialty Diver courses
  • Minimum of 50 logged dives

For more information on becoming a PADI Master Scuba Diver, contact your local PADI Dive Shop or Resort where you can explore PADI course options.

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 Scuba Review

The PADI Scuba Review Course

Has it been a while since you’ve been scuba diving? Do you feel like your scuba skills and knowledge are a bit rusty? The Scuba Review Tune-up is just the refresher you need. It reacquaints you with diving so that you're back to feeling comfortable in the underwater world in less than a day.

The Fun Part

Brush up on your scuba knowledge and skills. Improve your diving ability, and get your scuba gear ready for your next scuba vacation or diving holiday. 

 What You Learn

You go over scuba knowledge you learned during your initial training. Then, practice fundamental skills in a pool or a confined water area. You review:

  • Safe diving practices
  • Dive planning fundamentals
  • Problem management
  • Breathing air at depth
  • Recreational diving and dive tables: basic knowledge
  • Recreational diving and dive tables: dive planning

After you complete the knowledge assessment, you go through the Confined Water Skills Preview. You review information about each skill, why it’s important, points to remember when performing the skill and a short video clip. Completing this section just before practicing is a great way to refresh your knowledge of how each skill is performed.

The Scuba Review course is particularly beneficial if you:

  • Are a PADI Open Water Diver course referral student who wants a refresher prior to making your open water training dives
  • Are a PADI Scuba Diver who wants to upgrade to Open Water Diver
  • Just haven’t scuba dived in a while and want to get aclimated again

The Scuba Gear You Use

You use all the basic scuba gear.

Check with your local dive shop about gear rentals and packages offered with this course. You can find most everything at the scuba diving shop

The Learning Materials You Need

Quickly and effectively review scuba diving fundamentals with PADI’s Scuba Tune-Up Guidebook. Begin by answering a few questions related to dive safety, problem management and dive planning. For example:

What are the five steps in a pre-dive safety check?

What is the maximum depth limit for all recreational diving?

What are the signs and symptoms of decompression sickness?

At 12meters/ 40 feet a diver runs out of air. Her buddy is more than 60 feet away, what should she do?

Correct answers will allow you to complete the book quickly. For incorrect answers, you’ll read a brief explanation to help you understand the concept.

To purchase this product, contact your local PADI Instructor, dive shop or resort.

Prerequisites

To take Scuba Review, you must

  • Have a scuba diver certification or be enrolled in a scuba certification course
  • Be at least 10 years old
     
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 Rescue Diver

The PADI Rescue Diver Course

“Challenging” and “rewarding” best describe the PADI Rescue Diver course. Building upon what you’ve already learned, this course expands on what you already know about how to prevent problems, and how to manage them if they occur.

The Fun Part

The fun part about this course is rising to challenges and mastering them. Most divers find this course both demanding and rewarding, and at the end, say it’s the best course they’ve ever taken.

Get College Credit

You may be able to earn college credit for the PADI Rescue Diver Course.

What You Learn

  • Self rescue
  • Recognizing and managing stress in other divers
  • Emergency management and equipment
  • Rescuing panicked divers
  • Rescuing unresponsive divers

The Scuba Gear You Use

You use all your basic scuba gear including a dive computer and accessories.

Check with your local dive shop about the gear you’ll use during this course. You can find most everything at the scuba diving shop in your area.

The Learning Materials You Need

The PADI Rescue Diver crewpak includes all materials required to complete the PADI Rescue Diver course – including a pocket mask. You’ll learn how to think like a rescue diver and preview skills you’ll practice with your PADI Instructor. Once your Rescue Diver course is complete, you can review the DVD to refresh your dive safety skills as needed. This tool box of knowledge and technique will give you the expertise to handle almost any emergency situation.

To purchase this product, contact your local PADI Instructor, dive shop or resort.

Prerequisites

To enroll in the PADI Rescue Diver course, you must

  • Be 12 years or older
  • Have a PADI Adventure Diver certification (or have a qualifying certification from another organization)
  • Be trained and current for first aid and CPR within the previous two years (Ask your instructor about Emergency First Response CPR and first aid courses).

Rescue Diver Online

The PADI Rescue Diver course is the newest addition to the PADI eLearning® family. Rescue Diver Online gets you started right away and let's you learn at your own pace and in your own time. Start Now!

Your Next Adventure

After completing CPR and first aid and the PADI Rescue Diver course, you should take the PADI Emergency Oxygen Provider course Together, these three courses round out your ability to handle scuba diver emergencies.

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 Emergency First Response

Emergency First Response®

Take a step toward emergency preparedness and meet PADI Rescue Diver prerequisites with Emergency First Response. 

As one of the foremost international CPR and first aid training companies, Emergency First Response gives you the confidence to respond to medical emergencies -- not just in the diving world, but in your every day world with your family, friends, neighbors and coworkers too. 

Emergency First Response courses encompass: 

  • CPR courses for adults, children and infants 
  • First aid for adults, children and infants 
  • Automated External Defibrillator (AED) training 
  • Emergency Oxygen Provider course  
  • The Emergency First Response Instructor and Instructor Trainer courses 

Contact your local PADI Dive Shop or Resort to sign up for an Emergency First Response course today. Or, to learn more, visit the Emergency First Response website.  

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 Emergency Oxygen Provider

The PADI Emergency Oxygen Provider Course

Be the one ready to help a fellow diver should the need arise by becoming a PADI Emergency Oxygen Provider.

The Fun Part

Breathe easy—knowing that you know how to recognize illnesses treatable by emergency oxygen. Being the best buddy you can be means being prepared – especially in a time of need.

What You Learn

You learn how to

  • Recognize diving illnesses treatable by emergency oxygen
  • Properly setup equipment
  • Administer emergency oxygen

The Scuba Gear You Use

Scuba gear is not necessary to take this course.

The Learning Materials You Need

The PADI Emergency Oxygen Provider Manual is an important component of PADI’s Emergency Oxygen training program. Before class, you’ll review a step-by-step explanation of when and how to provide emergency oxygen. You’ll also learn about safety considerations, and how to assemble and disassemble emergency oxygen equipment. The care-at-a-glance card is a quick reference guide to pack in your gear bag and review in case of an emergency.
To purchase this product, contact your local PADI Instructor, dive shop or resort.

Prerequisites

Though suited for divers, this course has no prerequisites and doesn’t include dives, which means it is equally applicable to those who are around divers – boat crew, non-diving buddies, lifeguards, and shore staff. You don’t need any previous CPR or first aid training to take the course.

Your Next Adventure

The Emergency First Response certification, which covers CPR and first aid, pairs perfectly with the Emergency Oxygen Provider course.

You’ll also want to be sure to complete your Rescue Diver and Master Scuba Diver rating to be the best prepared dive buddy around.

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 Altitude Diver

The PADI Altitude Diver Course

Any time you’re diving at 300 to 3000 metres/1000 to 10,000 feet above sea level, you're altitude diving. If you want to explore the hidden world of a mountain lake, the PADI Altitude Diver Specialty course is for you.

The Fun Part

Dive more challenging dive sites while you satisfy your curiosity for “I wonder what’s down there?” The fun part about altitude diving is that you can explore places many people have never seen.

What You Learn

You’ll learn the effects of pressure at higher altitudes and how to adjust your dive plan accordingly. Whether you use a recreational dive planner table (RDPTM), an electronic eRDPTM or a dive computer, you’ll learn how plan and make a dive at high altitudes. You’ll learn :  

  • Altitude dive planning, organization, procedures, techniques, problems and hazards 
  • Recreational Dive PlannerTM procedures for diving at altitude 
  •  Safety stops and emergency decompression procedures at altitude
     

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 AWARE Fish ID(2)

The PADI Project AWARE Fish Identification Course

Have you ever been scuba diving and asked yourself, "What was that?”

The PADI Project AWARE Fish Identification Specialty course provides you with the fish identification basics so that next time, you know the answer.

The Fun Part

You’ll find you enjoy your dives even more when you recognize the creatures that you see. The fun part about this course is you can use the skills you learn on every scuba diving vacation because once you learn the main fish families and characteristics it will help you decipher the species you see all over the world.

For example, a butterfly fish in the Caribbean has a similar shape to a butterfly fish in Southeast Asia, but their colors and markings maybe wildly different. If you know what fish family it belongs to, it becomes much easier to look up the local name or at least be able to intelligently ask the local scuba instructor what you saw. That works better than asking about a “yellow thingy with a funny tail fin.”

What You Learn

During two dives you gain hands-on (okay, eyes-on) experience in looking for and identifying the fascinating fish you see underwater. You’ll learn :

  • How to identify characteristics of local fish families and species
  • Fish survey techniques and strategies
  • How to practice fish identification dive planning, organization and procedures

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 Boat Diver

The PADI Boat Diver Course

Whether you’ve never made a boat dive or you’ve logged dozens, the PADI Boat Diver Specialty course can benefit almost every diver because different boats in different parts of the world do things differently.

The Fun Part

Diving from a boat is fun, especially when you look at ease when maneuvering around on it. It’s fun to know what you’re doing.

What You Learn

Learn the tips, tricks and ways to

  • Dive from boats ranging from small inflatables to giant live-aboards :
    • how they differ from place to place
    • gain experience and training from diving on boats in your local area
  • Safely enter and exit the water :
    • sometimes it’s better to hand your gear up to the crew and then climb in the boat
    • sometimes you just take off your fins and weights and walk up the ladder
  • Stow your gear in the most appropriate areas
  • Use surface lines to initiate or conclude your dives.
  • Locate basic boat safety equipment

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 Cavern Diver(2)

The PADI Cavern Diver Course

Can you see the light? If you dive within the light zone of a cave–the area near the cave entrance where natural light is always visible–you're in the cavern zone.

The Fun Part

The fun part is exploring secrets hidden in caverns around the world and having the knowledge and skills to do it correctly.

What You Learn

This is a challenging and very exciting course that includes four training dives over at least two days. During your first open water dive you'll practice line handling, reel use and emergency procedures without entering a cavern. But, for your next three dives, you're headed into the cavern, staying within the light zone and 40 metres/130 feet total distance from the surface. You learn about

  • Cavern navigation and line protocols
  • Planning, organization, techniques, problems and hazards of cavern diving
  • Special equipment use, such as lights, guidelines, reels and redundant breathing systems
  • Air sharing, disorientation, silting, line problems and other emergency procedures specific to cavern diving
  • Silt prevention, buoyancy control, air management and emergency procedures
  • Depth and distant limits for cavern diving

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 Coral Reef Conservation

The AWARE Coral Reef Conservation Course

The AWARE Coral Reef Conservation Specialty course is designed to inform you about the world’s coral reefs.

The Fun Part

As a scuba diver, the health of aquatic ecosystems is often what makes a good dive. Become aware of the fragileness of coral reefs and how you can help preserve them. 

What You Learn

 The AWARE - Coral Reef Conservation Specialty course teaches you about the vital role of coral reefs in the marine environment. The course also familiarizes you with the current state of the world's coral reefs and how you can help. You will learn about the Project AWARE Foundation and:

  • How coral reefs function
  • Why they are so important
  • Why many reefs are in serious trouble
  • What you can do to prevent further decline

Visit Project AWARE Foundation to download your copy today.

Your Next Adventure

As you learn about coral reef conservation you may also want to work on a conservation project as part of your PADI National Geographic Diver certification.

Since fish life and coral reefs go hand in hand, it also makes sense to learn about fish identification with the AWARE Fish ID course.

You may also want to brush up on your underwater photography skills so that you can document and capture images of the conditions of the reefs and species you’re encountering.

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 Deep Diver

The PADI Deep Diver Course

After your first few scuba dives, you soon want to explore a bit deeper. There’s something exciting and mysterious about the depth that attracts dives.

The Fun Part

The fun part about this course is the opportunity to explore the deep. It’s exhilarating.

Get College Credit

You may be able to earn college credit for the PADI Deep Diver course!

What You Learn

  • Techniques for diving in the deeper  range of 18-40 metres/ 60-130 feet
    Deep scuba diving equipment considerations
  • Experience in planning, organizing and making at least four deep dives under the supervision of your PADI Instructor

To purchase learning materials and equipment, contact your local PADI dive shop or resort. 

Your Next Adventure

Many shipwrecks are often found in deeper water. That’s why the PADI Deep Diver course is a natural companion to the PADI Wreck Diver course. Sometimes you can take these two specialties concurrently.

Other training to consider is the PADI Enriched Air Diver course on your way to PADI Master Scuba Diver  

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 Digital Underwater Photographer course

The PADI Digital Underwater Photographer and Underwater Photographer Courses

Underwater photography is one of the most popular diving specialties, and the rise of digital underwater photography has made it easier and more fun than ever. This is why there are actually two PADI underwater photography courses. The PADI Digital Underwater Photographer course gets you going quickly with today modern digital equipment, whether you use a point-and-shoot snap camera or a sophisticated D-SLR like the pros. The PADI Underwater Photographer course is a more traditional photography course designed for conventional film equipment.

Take the PADI Digital Underwater Photograher Course Online Now!!!

The Fun Part

It's a great way to relive the adventures you’ve had. Plus capture images to share with your friends and family.

Get College CreditDescription: Snorkeler taking underwater photos

You may be able to earn college credit for the PADI Underwater Photographer Specialty course

What You Learn

  • How to choose the right underwater camera system for you
  • The PADI SEA method for getting great shots quickly
  • The three primary principles for good underwater photos

  To purchase learning materials and equipment, contact your local PADI dive shop or resort

  Take the PADI Digital Underwater Photograher Course Online Now!!!

Your Next Adventure

Two excellent specialties to pair with underwater photography are the PADI Enriched Air Diver course, and the PADI Dry Suit Diver course on your way to PADI Master Scuba Diver The PADI Enriched Air Diver course allows you to extend your time underwater so you have more time to capture images. In cooler climates, a dry suit allows you to dive comfortably longer, and to make more dives.

You may also find the Peak Performance Buoyancy course gives you helpful tips to optimize your weighting and skills so you’ll be in better position to capture that perfect picture.

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 Diver Propulsion Vehicle

The PADI Diver Propulsion Vehicle (DPV) Course

DPVs offer a thrilling way to see a lot of underwater territory in a brief amount of time. They scoot you through the water without kicking. Whether making a shore dive or diving from a boat, a DPV is a great way to see more and have a blast doing it.

The Fun Part

Fun? Underwater scooters (DPVs) are a kick! It’s all fun. 

What You Learn

  • You learn:
    Diver propulsion vehicle dive planning organization, procedures, techniques, problems and hazards
  • Equipment considerations
  • Diver etiquette and how to avoid harming fragile aquatic life

To purchase learning materials and equipment, contact your local PADI dive shop or resort

Your Next Adventure

DPVs can come in handy when wreck diving because they let you tour more of the wreck, plus reduce your air consumption. You may want to consider the PADI Wreck Diver course while working your way to Master Scuba Diver.

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 Drift Diver

The PADI Drift Diver Course

The PADI Drift Diver Specialty course introduces you to the coolest magic carpet ride you’ll ever experience. This course shows you how to enjoy rivers and ocean currents by “going with the flow,” staying with your dive partner, communicating with the dive boat and knowing where you are the whole time.

The Fun Part

Drift Diving is nearly effortless and relaxing. You simply glide along and enjoy the rush of flying underwater while the current does the work.

What You Learn

During your PADI Drift Diver certification course, you learn about:

  • Planning, organization, procedures, techniques, problems and hazards of drift diving
  • An introduction to drift diving equipment -- floats, lines, reels
  • Buoyancy-control, navigation and communication for drift diving
  • Site selection and overview of aquatic currents – causes and effects
  • Techniques for staying close to a buddy or together as a group

 To purchase learning materials and equipment, contact your local PADI dive shop or resort

Your Next Adventure

The Diver Propulsion Vehicle course introduces you to scuba diving with underwater scooters, which can come in handy while drift diving.

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 Dry Suit Diver

The PADI Dry Suit Diver course

Wanna stay warm and toasty on a dive? Then dive dry. Yes! Unlike a wetsuit, a dry suit seals you off from the outside water and that keeps you warm! Even in surprisingly cold water.

The Fun Part

Dry suits let you dive more challenging dive sites, and extend your dive season. When you have the right cold water scuba diving attire, you can stand up to the elements and take advantage of the generally better visibility offered by winter months—especially at inland dive sites such as quarries, lakes, sinkholes and caves etc. As a dry suit diver, you’re equipped to scuba dive some of the world’s incredible dive sites in the world’s cooler regions that are best enjoyed in a dry suit even in their warmer months.

Get College Credit

You may be able to earn college credit for the PADI Dry Suit Diver course.

What You Learn

Gain the knowledge and skills to safely don, dive with, doff and store a dry-suit. Get introduced to the different types of suits so you can make a very informed decision if considering purchasing a dry suit. You learn:

  • Dry suit buoyancy control skills
  • Dry suit maintenance, storage and basic repair
  • Undergarment (fleece or overall-type garments worn under the dry suit) options

Practical skills you’ll master in this course:

  • Dry Suit Familiarization
  • Safety Checks
  • Entry Techniques
  • Bubble Check
  • Buoyancy Check
  • Descent techniques
  • Fin Pivot
  • Hover
  • Excess gas in feet emergency roll drill
  • Stuck inflator emergency drill
  • Stuck exhaust valve emergency drill
  • Ascent procedure· Remove and replace scuba unit and weight belt on the surface
  • Exit techniques· Removal of dry suit, storage and maintenance

To purchase learning materials and equipment, contact your local PADI dive shop or resort

Your Next Adventure

Scuba diving with a dry suit is useful when diving many types of dive sites. A dry suit is necessary when ice diving and sometimes while altitude diving.

Many technical divers wear dry suits on almost every dive due to the length of the time spent underwater. The longer the diver is in the water, the more thermal protection is required. If technical diving is something that interests you, check out the Discover Tec Diving experience. 

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 Enriched Air Diver

Scuba Diving with Enriched Air Nitrox

The PADI Enriched Air Diver course is PADI’s most popular specialty scuba diving course, and it’s easy to see why. Scuba diving with enriched air nitrox gives you more no decompression dive time. This means more time underwater, especially on repetitive scuba dives.

The Fun Part

You can typically stay down longer and get back in the water sooner. No wonder many divers choose this as their very first specialty.

Get College Credit

You may be able to earn college credit for the PADI Enriched Air Diver course.

What You Learn

  • Techniques for getting more dive time by using enriched air nitrox
  • Enriched air scuba diving equipment considerations
  • Enriched air considerations, including managing oxygen exposure, how to tell what’s in your scuba tank and how to set your dive computer

 To purchase learning materials and equipment, contact your local PADI dive shop or resort

Your Next Adventure

Diving with enriched air nitrox benefits all types of diving, but it goes especially well with these specialties:

  • PADI Wreck Diver course – Popular wrecks tend to be deeper, so enriched air nitrox maximizes your exploration time.
  • PADI Deep Diver course – The deeper you dive, the shorter your no stop time – but enriched air nitrox increases it, giving your more time at depth
  • PADI Digital Underwater Photographer – Photographers usually like to make several dives so they can get lots of pictures. Enriched air nitrox reduces the amount of residual nitrogen you accumulate, allowing repetitive dives to be longer.
  • PADI Master Scuba Diver The PADI Enriched Air Diver course counts toward your Master Scuba Diver rating -- the highest non professional rating in recreational diving

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 Equipment Specialist

The PADI Equipment Specialist Course

Don’t miss a dive due to a scuba gear issue.

Whether it's a blown o-ring, regulator problem, wetsuit tear or a broken fin strap, you can learn how to manage basic scuba equipment adjustments.

As a PADI Equipment Specialist, you are prepared for the basic scuba equipment maintenance, care and adjustments you'll encounter every day. In addition, you'll learn interesting background information about how your gear works, how it’s repair and other information that helps you with your equipment investment.

The Fun Part

The more you know about how your dive gear works, the more

  • Comfortable you are with it
  • Performance you get from it
  • You can care for it

What You Learn

  • Review the theory, principles and operation of scuba diving equipment 
  • Learn about routine, recommended care and maintenance procedures, and equipment storage
  • How to overcome common problems with equipment and recommended professional maintenance procedures (may include a demonstration of repair procedures)
  • Gain simple suggestions for comfortable equipment configurations and an introduction to new gear (may include optional confined water dive to try new or unfamiliar equipment)

To purchase learning materials and equipment, contact your local PADI dive shop or resort

Your Next Adventure

The PADI Equipment Specialist Course is not an equipment repair course, but it provides the foundation you’ll want if you’re interested in learning equipment repair

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 Ice Diver

The PADI Ice Diver Course

If the spirit of adventure and unusual, challenging diving appeals to you, try diving under the ice.

During the course, you dive with a PADI Professional in one of the most extreme adventure specialties recreational diving offers.

The Fun Part

Explore the unique aquascape found only under ice. You can be one of the few that have ever dived under a solid ceiling of ice. Plus, imagine the look on your Divemaster’s face on your next Caribbean trip when you flash your PADI Ice Diver certification.

You might get a chance to play with your exhaled air bubbles on the bottom of the ice or an opportunity to try the unique sport of upside down, bottom of the ice, skiing.

What You Learn

You will complete a minimum of three ice dives for your certification. Dives are typically done as a group working with support personnel, divers, tenders, and safety divers. You are under the ice to learn to control buoyancy, navigate under the ice, and keep in contact with the lead diver and tenders via line pulls.

You learn:

  • To plan and organize ice dives
  • Reasons and opportunities for ice diving,
  • Equipment considerations
  • About site selection, preparation and hole-cutting procedures
  • How to practice the procedures and techniques for handling the problems and hazards of ice diving
  • To use specialized ice diving equipment, safety lines, signals, communications, line tending and line-securing techniques
  • How to manage equipment problems
  • About the effects of cold, emergency procedures and safety-diver procedures

To purchase learning materials and equipment, contact your local PADI dive shop or resort

Your Next Adventure

Although some ice divers dive in a wetsuit, you’ll probably find that you are more comfortable in a dry suit. The PADI Dry Suit Diver course can help you become familiar with the nuances of using a dry suit.

While you’re brushing up on your specialty diving skills, you should also take the Rescue Diver course, which puts you just on step closer to the Master Scuba Diver rating.

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 Multilevel Diver

The PADI Multilevel Diver Course

Maximize your dive time so you can explore more!

In this course, you learn how to plan dives that extend your bottom time by crediting you for slower nitrogen absorption when you ascend to a shallower depth. That’s the way you really dive, after all.

The Fun Part

This is a great way to learn how to make multilevel dives even if you forget to bring your dive computer.

What You Learn

You'll learn what multilevel diving is and why you want to plan for multilevel dives. You'll also get to see the various types of multilevel dive calculators (including dive computers), as well as learn about multilevel dive planning, organization, procedures, techniques, and potential problems. You'll plan a multilevel dive profile and dive it with your PADI Instructor.

You learn how to:

  • Plan and execute multilevel dives (different depths on the same dive)
  • Back up your dive computer and plan multilevel dives
  • Maximize your no stop time

To purchase learning materials and equipment, contact your local PADI dive shop or resort

Your Next Adventure

Multilevel diving is often conducted while deep diving or wreck diving. Multilevel diving combined with Enriched Air Nitrox provides the longest no stop dive times possible.

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 National Geographic Diver

The PADI National Geographic Diver Course

Join an elite group of divers who are more than tourists, but explorers, adventurers and conservationists.

The Fun Part

The fun part about the PADI National Geographic Diver certification is the opportunity to participate in an exploration project. You'll learn to observe and explore like an underwater scientist.

What You Learn

The insight and training you gain during this program will broaden your awareness and take your diving skills to a new level. You will complete a minimum of two dives during this certification.

As part of the National Geographic Diver Specialty course, you fine-tune your buoyancy, then set off on your exploration project. Whether it’s a survey of plant life or a study of water temperature variation, this project is your chance to think, observe and document like those who dive for science and discovery. On your next dive you’ll hone your navigation skills, then dive into an aquatic life exercise – which may also be part of your exploration project.

You learn:

  • How to observe your surroundings to get the best experience from each dive
  • Practical experience by gathering information and collecting images to create a visual representation of a dive site, detailing what you’ve discovered through your observations
  • Improved underwater navigation skills and ability to find your way around underwater by using a compass as well as natural references
  • You’ll be introduced to a multitude of aquatic species and be able to identify local plants and animals.

To purchase learning materials and equipment, contact your local PADI dive shop or resort

Your Next Adventure

During the PADI National Geographic Diver course you’ll learn about Peak Performance Buoyancy, Underwater Navigation, Coral Reef Conservation, Fish Identification, underwater photography —all of which are PADI specialty courses for you to delve deeper.

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 Night Diver

The PADI Night Diver Course

As the sun sets, you don your dive gear, slip on your scuba mask and bite down on your dive regulator. A deep breath and you step off the boat – into the underwater night. Although you’ve seen this reef many times before, this time you drop into a whole new world and watch it come to life under the glow of your dive light.

The Fun Part

Introduce yourself to the whole new cast of critters that comes out after the sun goes down. See your favorite dive sites from a whole new perspective at night.

Get Credit

You may be able to earn college credit for the PADI Night Diver course!  

What You Learn 

  • Night dive planning, organization, procedures, techniques and potential problems
  • How to control your buoyancy at night
  • Entries, exits and underwater navigation at night
  • Nocturnal aquatic life, since many of the plants and animals you'll see are different

To purchase learning materials and equipment, contact your local PADI dive shop or resort 

Your Next Adventure

Take your navigation skills to new levels with the PADI Underwater Navigator course.

Get your buoyancy dialed in with the PADI Peak Performance Buoyancy course.

Recognize what those critters are on your night dive with the AWARE Fish Identification course.

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 Peak Performance Buoyancy

The PADI Peak Performance Buoyancy Course

What is neutral buoyancy? Scuba divers like to be neutrally buoyant so they neither sink nor float. It can be a tricky thing. Divers who’ve mastered the highest performance levels in buoyancy stand apart. You’ve seen them underwater. They glide effortlessly, use less air and ascend, descend or hover, almost as if by thought. They interact gently with aquatic life and affect their surroundings minimally. The PADI Peak Performance Buoyancy course refines the basic skills you learned as a PADI Open Water Diver and elevates them to the next level.

The Fun Part

The fun part of this course is giving your dive skills a polish you may not have thought possible.

What You Learn

  • How to trim your scuba gear so you’re perfectly balanced in the water
  • Nuances in determining weight so you’re not too light nor too heavy by even a slight degree
  • How to streamline to save air and move smoothly through the water
  • How to hover effortlessly in both a vertical position and a horizontal position

To purchase learning materials and equipment, contact your local PADI dive shop or resort

Your Next Adventure

Part of mastering buoyancy control is learning how to use your BCD and weight system effectively, plus maintain streamlining. This makes the PADI Equipment Specialist course a natural companion, because you learn more about these pieces of gear and how to make them suit your specific diving styles.

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 Project AWARE Specialty

Project AWARE Specialty

The underwater world needs heroes. You can be one of them by championing the causes of the world’s most fragile and important aquatic ecosystems.

The Fun Part

You can make a difference.

Learn about some of the most pressing problems facing these vulnerable environments and everyday actions you can take to help conserve them. It’s informative, interesting and most importantly, you learn how to make a difference.

What You Learn

Project AWARE Foundation is the scuba diving industry’s leading nonprofit environmental organization dedicated to conserving the aquatic environment through education, advocacy and action. Besides completing the Project AWARE Specialty course, you can become a partner in the efforts to preserve the underwater environment.

You learn about:

  • The ocean commons and coastal zone issues
  • Fisheries challenges and sustainability
  • Coral environment overview and inhabitants
  • The role of the scuba diver in protecting aquatic environments

Visit Project AWARE Foundation to download your copy today.

Prerequisites

  • There are no prerequisites for this course.

Your Next Adventure

If you are interested in becoming an underwater conservationist, you’ll also enjoy these specialty courses:

PADI National Geographic Diver 
AWARE Fish Identification 
Coral Reef Conservation 
Underwater Naturalist 
Peak Performance Buoyancy 
Digital Underwater Photography 
Underwater Videographer 

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 PADI Rebreather Diver

PADI Rebreather Courses   

Think rebreathers are just for technical diving? Think again because the latest rebreathers are lightweight, easy-transportable units that use sophisticated electronics to simplify their use. Rebreathers allow longer no decompression limits, reduced gas consumption and unmatched wildlife encounters.

What is a rebreather?

The primary difference between rebreathers and open-circuit units is that rebreathers reuse some or all of the gas you exhale. There are two basic types of rebreathers: closed-circuit rebreathers (CCRs) and semi-closed rebreathers (SCRs).

The PADI Rebreather and Advanced Rebreather Diver courses use Type R units to introduce divers to rebreather diving within recreational dive limits. Type R rebreathers are electronically controlled and provide a back up for all the major systems and simplify training and use.

All rebreathers used during PADI courses must be third-party tested and manufacturers must ensure they meet a comprehensive list of requirements.

Because each rebreather model is different, you will need to qualify on each rebreather model. However, once you are qualified you will not need to repeat the entire course to earn your certification with a different Type R rebreather model. The PADI Rebreather Qualifier focuses on the knowledge and skills needed to use a different Type R rebreather model.

PADI Rebreather Diver

In this entry-level rebreather program you will learn to use Type R rebreathers to a maximum of 18 metres/60 feet within no decompression limits.

Prerequisites:

  • PADI Open Water Diver and PADI Enriched Air Diver certifications (or qualifying certifications from a recognized organization).
  • 25 logged dives
  • 18 years old

Description: Tec Flowchart 06Mar2012

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 Search and Recovery

The PADI Search and Recovery Diver Course

Have you ever dropped something in the water? Are you looking for lost “treasure”? The PADI Search and Recovery Diver Specialty course will teach you effective ways to find objects underwater and bring them to the surface. Small, large or just awkward, there is a way to bring them up.

The Fun Part

Find lost items and lift them to the surface. It’s fun to use the lift bag. Not only are these skills fun, but very practical and ultimately useful because eventually, you’ll lose something in the water. As a Search and Recovery Diver, you’ll know how to search for and recover it.

Get Credit

You may be able to earn college credit for the PADI Search and Recovery Diver course. 

What You Learn

  • Search and recovery dive planning, organization, procedures, techniques and how to deal with potential problems
  • How to locate large and small objects using search patterns
  • How to use a lift bag and other recovery methods
  • Limited visibility search techniques

  To purchase learning materials and equipment, contact your local PADI dive shop or resort

Your Next Adventure

Because you often need to navigate to specific spots to find lost items, the Underwater Navigator course can help you perfect your navigation skills.

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 Semiclosed Rebreather

The PADI Semiclosed Rebreather Course

If novelty and diving quietly appeal to to you, then try the Semiclosed Rebreather course.

The Fun Part

The main feature of a semiclosed rebreather is the reduced bubbles and silence it offers, which allows you to get closer to shy wildlife.

What You Learn

Through the Semiclosed Rebreather Specialty course you learn the special procedures for semiclosed rebreather scuba diving. This includes special dive planning, organization, procedures and potential hazards, many of which differ significantly from conventional (open circuit) scuba.

It specifically focuses on the features, accessories, maintenance and proper use of the Draeger Semi-closed Rebreather. You make at least one confined water dive and at least three open water dives to learn:

  • Advantages and disadvantages of the rebreather
  • Assembly, disassembly and maintenance
  • Dive planning and emergency procedures with semiclosed rebreathers

To purchase learning materials and equipment, contact your local PADI dive shop or resort

Your Next Adventure

While diving with a rebreather and getting up close and personal with the wildlife, you’ll probably want your underwater camera to capture the memories. The PADI Digital Underwater Photographer course can give you the tips you need to bring home some great snapshots.

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 PADI Sidemount

PADI Sidemount Diver Course

 Find a new and different way to configure your cylinders with the PADI Sidemount Diver course. Sidemount diving offers: 

  • an alternative way to streamline in the water 
  • easier equipment transportation when topside 
  • reduced lower back strain  
  • provides redundant gas supply 
  • ability to monitor all equipment because it’s in front of you 
  • increased gas supply for longer dives

Because you are able to move the cylinder from your back to your side, it instantly takes the pressure off of your back and gives you more flexibility to move and enjoy your dive.  Plus, you don’t have to walk to the dive site with the cylinders on your back. You can enter the water and clip them on and go.   

Prerequisites:  
     - PADI Open Water Diver 
     - At least 15 years old 

You can easily combine sidemount diving with any other PADI Specialty you have take. Contact your local PADI Dive Center or Resort to sign up for the PADI Sidemount course today! 

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 Underwater Naturalist

The PADI Underwater Naturalist Course

Look closer to see more on your next dive. Look for symbioses, predator/prey and other relationships between aquatic plant and animal life. Learn not just what fish and animals are, but how they interact with each other and the environment.

The Fun Part

Learn about why some creatures behave the way they do and what their role is in the aquatic ecosystem.

What You Learn

  • The major aquatic life groupings, interactions and factual information that dispels negative myths.
  • The role of aquatic plants, food chains and predator prey relationships
  • Responsible interactions with aquatic life
  • The underwater naturalist’s view of organisms and their roles in the environment

You put this information into practice during your two open water dives.

To purchase learning materials and equipment, contact your local PADI dive shop or resort

Your Next Adventure

If you are interested in becoming an underwater conservationist or documenting what you encounter, you’ll also enjoy these specialty courses:

PADI National Geographic Diver 
AWARE Fish Identification 
Coral Reef Conservation 
Project AWARE Specialist 
Peak Performance Buoyancy 
Digital Underwater Photography 
Underwater Videographer 

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 Underwater Navigator

The PADI Underwater Navigator Course

Be the diver everyone wants to follow and make your sense of direction legendary with the PADI Underwater Navigator Specialty course.

The Fun Part

Finding your way is not a matter of luck! When everyone’s buzzing about a reef or checking out a shipwreck, they’re having a great time – until it’s time to go. Then they turn to you, because as a PADI Underwater Navigator, you know the way back to the boat.

Get  College Credit

You may be able to earn college credit for the PADI Underwater Navigator Course.

What You Learn

Underwater navigation can be challenging, but in the PADI Underwater Navigator Specialty course, you master the challenge. You learn the tools of the trade, including navigation via natural clues and by compass.

You learn

  • Navigation patterns
  • Natural navigation (without a compass)
  • Compass navigation
  • How to “mark” or relocate a submerged object or position from the surface
  • Underwater map making
  • How to follow irregular courses with the Nav-Finder
  • Dive site relocation
  • How to estimate distance underwater

To purchase learning materials and equipment, contact your local PADI dive shop or resort

Prerequisites

You must be:

  • A PADI Open Water Diver or Junior Open Water Diver (or qualifying certification from  another organization)
  • At least 10 years old

Your Next Adventure

Underwater navigation is an important skill no matter what type of scuba diving you’re doing. It’s especially useful when night diving, wreck diving or when you’re searching to recover a lost item underwater.

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 Underwater Videographer

The PADI Underwater Videographer Course

Other than taking someone diving, there’s only one way to show someone the sounds, motion and dynamics of the underwater world: video.

The Fun Part

Show your scuba vacation adventures to your friends and family. Use your editing skills to share your clips with the world through YouTube, MySpace, Facebook and more. Use your underwater videos to turn more of your friends into dive buddies.

What You Learn

The PADI Underwater Videographer Specialty course shows you how to create videos that are interesting, entertaining and worth watching again and again.

  • Selecting, maintaining and caring for your underwater video equipment
  • Videography fundamentals, such as
       · exposure
       · focus
       · shot types
       · moves
       · story line
      · shot sequencing.
  • The post-dive editing process where you take your raw footage and create an underwater masterpiece.

By the time you complete the course, you’ll have gone through the entire basic video production process.

To purchase learning materials and equipment, contact your local PADI dive shop or resort

Your Next Adventure

Part of the secret to getting good video is having great buoyancy skills to capture the footage you’re seeking. The Peak Performance Buoyancy course can help you fine tune your skills.

Also, some of the tips and skills you learn from underwater videography can also help you take better underwater photos. Check out the Digital Underwater Photography course.

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 Wreck Diver

Whether sunk on purpose as an artificial reef or the result of mishap, wrecks open fascinating windows to the past. Most divers find wrecked ships, airplanes and even automobiles nearly irresistible because they’re intriguing to explore, exciting avenues of discovery, and usually teeming with aquatic life. The PADI Wreck Diver course teaches you the ins and outs of rewarding, responsible wreck diving.

The Fun Part

The fun part of the PADI Wreck Diver course is visiting wrecks, unlocking mysteries and starting to gain the knowledge and experience that allows you to see things that others overlook. Sometimes, only the trained, experienced eye recognizes that a small hole or open door likely caused the vessel’s demise.

Get College Credit

You may be able to earn college credit for the PADI Wreck Diver Specialty course. 

  What You Learn

  • Techniques for diving exploring shipwrecks, and how to avoid common hazards
  • How to research and learn the background of your favorite wrecks
  • Wreck scuba diving equipment considerations
  • Considerations and techniques for entering intact wrecks
  • Experience in planning, organizing and making at least four wreck dives under the supervision of your PADI Instructor

To purchase learning materials and equipment, contact your local PADI dive shop or resort

 Your Next Adventure

Many shipwrecks are often found in deeper water. That’s why the PADI Wreck Diver course is a natural companion to the PADI Deep Diver course. Sometimes you can take these two specialties concurrently.

Other training to consider is the PADI Enriched Air Diver course on your way to PADI Master Scuba Diver.

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 Discover Tec Diving

Discover Tec Diving Experience

DSAT Discover Tec lets you try technical diving equipment and procedures. 

What You'll Learn

You learn about technical diving and get to try it out. Plus, Discover Tec experiences can also credit towards the Tec 40 course. 

The Scuba Gear You'll Use

You will need your basic scuba gear and you will try technical scuba diving equipment. 

Prerequisites

To participate in Discover Tec Diving, you must: 

  • Be a PADI Open Water Diver (or qualifying certification from another organization) 
  • Have a minimum of 10 logged dives 
  • Be at least 18 years old

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 Tec 40

Tec 40 Course

If you're interested in technical diving, but haven't yet met the prerequisites for the PADI Tec 50 Diver course or PADI Tec 45 course, you can consider enrolling in the PADI Tec 40 course. It is the first subdivision of the full PADI Tec Deep Diver course and consists of the first four dives. Because you can do one of  these dives in confined water (such as a swimming pool), many divers start the Tec 40 courses in the winter months, ready to continue in open water when spring arrives. 

You'll learn to

  • Use decompression software and dive computers to plan and make decompression dives with no more than 10 minutes of total decompression and not deeper than 40 metres/130 feet. 
  • Use a single cylinder of decompression gas with up to 50 percent oxygen (EANx50) to add conservatism to the required decompression. 

Since it's part of the course, your PADI Tec 40 course training credits toward the PADI Tec 45 and Tec 50 courses. 

The Scuba Gear You'll Use

You use recreational scuba equipment, with some minor additions to enhance your ability to deal with tec diving conditions. 

The Learning Materials You'll Need

You'll use the Tec Deep Diver Crew-Pak, which introduces you to 

  • tec diving lingo 
  • emergency procedures 
  • decompression and stage cylinder handling 
  • gas planning 

The pak includes a manual, dive planning checklist and dive planning slate. The optional Equipment Set-up and Key Skillsvideo on DVD is a great tool to help you practice at home in between your tec diving adventures. You'll continue to use the Tec Deep Diver Crew-Pak through Tec 50. 

Prerequisites

You must: 

• Be a PADI Advanced Open Water Diver (or hold a qualifying certification from another organization)
• Be a PADI Enriched Air Diver (or hold a qualifying certification from another organization)
• Be a PADI Deep Diver (or hold a qualifying certification from another organization)
• Have a minimum of 30 logged dives, of which at least 10 dives were made with enriched air nitrox deeper than 18 metres / 60 feet.
• Have a medical form signed by your physician

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 Tec 45

Tec 45 Course Description: TecRec Logo

The Tec 45 course picks up where Tec 40 leaves off and  takes your training as a tec diver further and deeper. It is the second subcourse in the full PADI Tec Diver course 

What You Learn

  • The skills and equipment and planning need to dive to a maximum of 45 metres/145 feet 
  • The knowledge to plan and execute single and repetitive decompression dives using a single stage cylinder of EANx or oxygen to accelerate or add conservatism to the decompression stops. 
  • There would be no time limit to amount of decompression 
  • Prepare for and respond to foreseeable technical diving emergencies  
  • Master the basic skills and procedures you’ll need as you move into deeper technical diving 

The Scuba Gear You Use

You use basic tec diving equipment  

The Learning Materials You Need

You'll use the Tec Deep Diver Crew-Pak, which introduces you to 

  • tec diving lingo 
  • emergency procedures 
  • decompression and stage cylinder handling 
  • gas planning 

The pak includes a manual, dive planning checklist and dive planning slate. The optional Equipment Set-up and Key Skillsvideo on DVD is a great tool to help you practice at home in between your tec diving adventures. You'll continue to use the Tec Deep Diver Crew-Pak through the Tec 50 course. 

Prerequisites

You must be 

  • A PADI Advanced Open Water Diver (or hold a qualifying certification from another organization) 
  • A PADI Rescue Diver (or hold a qualifying certification from another organization) 
  • A PADI Enriched Air Diver (or hold a qualifying certification from another organization) 
  • A PADI Deep Diver (or hold aqualifying certification from another organization) 
  • PADI Tec 40 (or hold a qualifying certification from another organization) 
  • Have a minimum of 50 logged dives, of which at least:
       - 12 dives were made with enriched air nitrox deeper than 18 metres/60 feet
       - 6 (with or without EANx) dives were deeper than 30 metres/100 feet
  • At least 18 years old 
  • Have a medical statement signed by a physician

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 Tec 50

Tec 50 Course

The Tec 50 course completes your training as an entry-level tec diver, taking you past the limits of recreational diving. 

What You'll Learn

During the Tec 50 course, you 

• Make actual decompression dives as deep as 50 metres/165 feet
• Use enriched air nitrox and/or oxygen for decompression
• Use desk top decompression software to create custom dive tables and plan your dives
• Qualify to make technical decompression dives independently   

Get College Credit

You may be able to earn college credit for the PADI Tec 50 Course. 

The Scuba Gear You'll Use

You use technical scuba diving equipment  

The Learning Materials You'll Need

The Tec Deep Diver Crew-Pak, which introduces you to tec diving lingo, emergency procedures, decompression and stage cylinder handling and gas planning. The pak includes a manual, dive planning checklist and dive planning slate. The optional Equipment Set-up and Key Skillsvideo on DVD is a great tool to help you practice at home in between your tec diving adventures. 

To purchase this product, contact your local PADI Instructor, dive shop or resort. 

Prerequisites

You must: 

  • Be a PADI Advanced Open Water Diver (or hold a qualifying certification from another organization) 
  • Be a PADI Rescue Diver (or hold a qualifying certification from another organization) 
  • Be a PADI Enriched Air Diver (or hold a qualifying certification from another organization) 
  • DSAT Tec 45 Diver (or hold a qualifying certification from another organization) 
  • Have a minimum of 100 logged dives, of which
        · 20 dives must be enriched air dives
        · 25 dives must be deeper than 18 metres/60 feet
        · at least 20 dives must be deeper than 30 metres/100 feet 
  • Be at least 18 years old 
  • Have a medical statement signed by your physician

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 Tec Trimix 65

Tec Trimix 65 Course

This course opens up the advantages of trimix to the diver, and divers are qualified to make multi-stop decompression dives that employ EANx and oxygen for accelerated decompression, and any trimix with an oxygen content of 18% or more. 

They can dive to a maximum depth of 65 metres/210 feet. 

What You'll Learn

The PADI Tec Trimix 65 course is intended to extend the depth range of technical divers already trained and qualified to use air, enriched air and oxygen for technical decompression dives beyond 50 metres /165 feet. 

This course is for Tec 50 divers (or those holding a qualifying certification from another training organization). The course extends your depth range capabilities by training you to use trimix (a blend of helium, oxygen and nitrogen). 

You will:
• Plan and execute at least five dives using EANx and trimix blends
• Use decompression software to create custom dive tables and dive plans
• Make training dives as deep as 65 metres/210 feet 

Scuba Gear You'll Use

  • Double cylinders (minimum 12 litre/70 cubic feet each, with larger preferred) with isolator manifold 
  • Primary and secondary regulators, one with two metre/seven foot hose (approximately) for gas sharing, and one with SPG 
  • Stage/decompression cylinders with regulator, SPG, mounting hardware and proper labeling/markings. Two per diver will be required 
  • Backup decompression cylinders as appropriate and required for the environment 
  • BCD and harness – redundant buoyancy control is required (double bladder BCD or dry suit if suitable for weight of equipment worn) 
  • Depth gauge/computer and backup depth gauge/computer 
  • Timing device and backup timing device 
  • Trimix decompression information (tables/trimix computer) and backup decompression information 
  • Exposure suit appropriate for environment and dive duration. (If you use a dry suit, you should be trained/experienced with its use in recreational and technical diving prior to using it for trimix training or diving.) 
  • Argon dry suit inflation or other inflation system as needed 
  • Weight system (if needed) 
  • Jon line (if needed for current diving environments) 
  • Inflatable signal tube 
  • Reel 
  • Lift bag (bright yellow or per local community practice preferred) 
  • Dive knife / cutting device and backup slate, backup mask (optional) 
  • Compass, lights (optional) 
  • Drift kit (if drift decompressing) 

Learning Materials You'll Need

Tec Trimix Diver Crew-Pak 

The Tec Trimix Diver Crew-Pak includes all required materials,  including: manual, deep stop calculation table, trimix decal and emergency procedures slate. 

Topics covered include:
    * Trimix diving depth ranges
    * Exposure planning
    * Selecting a mix
    * Argon inflation systems
    * Handling three or four decompression cylinders
    * Decompression models
    * Emergency procedures
    * Face masks and multi-gas computers. 

To purchase this product, contact your local PADI Instructor, dive shop or resort. 

Prerequisites

You must 

  • Be a PADI Rescue Diver (or hold a qualifying certification from another organization and having proof of CPR and first aid training with the previous two years). 
  • Be certified as a Tec 50 (or hold a qualifying certification from another organization) 
  • Be at least 18 years old 
  • Have logged at least 100 dives 
  • Have a medical form signed by your physician.

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 Tec Trimix Diver

Tec Trimix Diver Course

 For the extreme diver ready to further explore the world of technical deep diving, the gas of choice is trimix – a blend of oxygen, helium and nitrogen. 

The PADI Tec Trimix Diver course takes you to the outer edges of technical deep diving, opening the door to pristine dive sites few divers – if any – ever see.

Get College Credit

You may be able to earn college credit for the Tec Trimix Diver Course. 

What You Learn

The PADI Tec Trimix Diver course is intended to extend the depth range of technical divers already trained and qualified to use air, enriched air and oxygen for technical decompression dives beyond 50 metres/165 feet. Diving with trimix is the outer edge of tec diving – the maximum depth for using this technology has yet to be defined.

This course is for Tec 50or Tec Trimix 65 (or those holding a qualifying certification from another training organization). The course extends your depth range capabilities by training you to use trimix (a blend of helium, oxygen and nitrogen).

You will
• Plan and execute between three to eight dives (depending upon whether you enter the course as a Tec 50 diver or Tec Trimix 65 diver) using EANX and trimix blends
• Use decompression software to create custom dive tables and dive plans
• Make training dives as deep as 90 metres/300feet

The Scuba Gear You'll Use

  • Double cylinders (minimum 12 litre/70 cubic feet each, with larger preferred) with isolator manifold
  • Primary and secondary regulators, one with two metre/seven foot hose (approximately) for gas sharing, and one with SPG
  • Stage/decompression cylinders with regulator, SPG, mounting hardware and proper labeling/markings. Two per diver will be required
  • Backup decompression cylinders as appropriate and required for the environment
  • BCD and harness – redundant buoyancy control is required (double bladder BCD or dry suit if suitable for weight of equipment worn)
  • Depth gauge/computer and backup depth gauge/computer
  • Timing device and backup timing device
  • Trimix decompression information (tables/trimix computer) and backup decompression information
  • Exposure suit appropriate for environment and dive duration. (If you use a dry suit, you should be trained/experienced with its use in recreational and technical diving prior to using it for trimix training or diving.)
  • Argon dry suit inflation or other inflation system as needed
  • Weight system (if needed)
  • Jon line (if needed for current diving environments)
  • Inflatable signal tube
  • Reel
  • Lift bag (bright yellow or per local community practice preferred)
  • Dive knife / cutting device and backup slate, backup mask (optional)
  • Compass, lights (optional)
  • Drift kit (if drift decompressing)

The Learning Materials You'll Need

Tec Trimix Diver Crew- Pak

The Tec Trimix Diver Crew-Pak includes all required materials,  including: manual, deep stop calculation table, trimix decal and emergency procedures slate.

Topics covered include:
    * Trimix diving depth ranges
    * Exposure planning
    * Selecting a mix
    * Argon inflation systems
    * Handling three or four decompression cylinders
    * Decompression models
    * Emergency procedures
    * Face masks and multi-gas computers.

To purchase this product, contact your local PADI Instructor, dive shop or resort.

Prerequisites

You must

  • Be a PADI Rescue Diver (or hold a qualifying certification from another organization and having proof of CPR and first aid training with the previous two years)
  • Be certified as a Tec 50 or Tec Trimix 65 (or those holding a qualifying certification from another training organization)
  • Be at least 18 years old
  • Have logged at least 150 dives
  • Have a medical form signed by your physician

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 Tec Gas Blender

Gas Blender Course

More people are diving with enriched air and this means the demand for enriched air fills is also increasing.

However, there needs to be someone qualified to administer these fills to meet this demand. This is where the PADI Gas Blender course comes in.

It can result in one of two certifications: PADI Gas Blender or PADI Trimix Blender. 

What You'll Learn

The Gas Blender course will train you as a qualified gas blender, allowing you to provide gas mixes to appropriately certified consumers.

You'll learn the physical properties of oxygen, its associated hazards, handling requirements and what cleaning equipment is necessary. Finally, you will learn the five methods of obtaining the desired enriched air nitrox mix and the various methods used to obtain proper helium mixes.

The Learning Materials You'll Need

What are the four main types of oxygen? What is oxygen clean? What are the five methods for blending Enriched Air? These questions and more are covered in the Gas Blender manual

As a gas blender you must be familiar with the physical properties of oxygen, its various forms and purities, hazards and special handling requirements. The Gas Blender Manual and CD-ROM, in conjunction with your instructor, will familiarize you with the procedures and techniques needed for gas blending.

To purchase this product, contact your local PADI Instructor, dive shop or resort.

Prerequisites

You must be

  • A PADI Enriched Air Diver certification (or qualifying certification from another organization)
  • At least 18 years old

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 Tec 40 CCR Diver

Tec 40 CCR Diver Course

Learn to plan and make dives using air diluent and air or enriched air (EANx) bailout gas on Type T (technical) closed-circuit rebreathers (CCR) to a maximum of 40 metres/130 feet with a single decompression stop of no more than 10 minutes.

Tec 40 CCR Diver is the first level of training that addresses technical diving with Type T CCRs, which include a range of electronic CCRs (eCCRs) and manual CCRS (mCCRs). Tec 40 CCR Diver introduces student divers to diagnosing life-support problems and, when possible, returning to the loop to complete the dive with limited decompression obligations.

This training is significantly more challenging than recreational rebreather divingbecause divers learn to be both a tec diver as well as learning to tec dive with a CCR.

Prerequisites:

  • PADI Advanced Open Water Diver, PADI Enriched Air Diver, PADI Deep Diver (or have experience of more than 10 dives to 30 metres/100 feet) certification and at least 30 dives logged with specific experience requirements.
  • Prior to Training Dive Five, student divers must be certified as PADI Rescue Divers
  • Prior to certification, student divers must have 50 dives logged.
  • There are provisions for other qualifying certifications.
  • 18 years old

What is a closed-circuit rebreather?

Closed-circuit rebreathers are a type of scuba that reuses the gas you exhale. This is the primary difference between CCR and open-circuit scuba.

All CCRs used on PADI TecRec CCR courses must be third party tested and manufacturers must ensure they meet a comprehensive list of requirements and register them with PADI.

Tec 40 CCR Qualifier program

Due to differences between CCRs, divers qualify on each CCRs, however, once qualified you will not need to repeat the entire course if you want to learn to dive a different Type T CCR. The Tec 40 CCR Qualifier focuses on the knowledge and skills divers need to cross over from one Type T CCR to another.

Background on Closed Circuit Rebreathers

Technical diving has been revolutionized by the development, availability and reliability of Closed Circuit Rebreathers. CCRs provide numerous benefits to the technical diver, including: reduced gas consumption, optimum EANx blends for decompression and a wider range of solutions to equipment problems. Consequently CCRs potentially allow the technical diver a greater access to time underwater - greater time based on gas logistics when compared with an open circuit technical diver and more time available to find solutions to gas management problems. As time is a critical and a finite resource divers wanting to dive at and beyond the recreational envelope can now choose PADI Technical CCR training to achieve their goals.

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 Tec 60 CCR Diver

Tec 60 CCR Diver

Tec 60 CCR Diver is an intermediate technical Closed Circuit Rebreather (CCR) diver program where you'll learn to use life support equipment in completing dives outside the recreational and air diluent envelope.

You will learn to plan and make dives using trimix/heliox (minimum 16% oxygen) as a diluent using a Type T CCR to a maximum depth of 60 metres/200 feet and complete multiple decompression stops while carrying adequate bail out gas for the dive.

Tec 60 CCR Diver is the second level of training that addresses technical diving with Type T CCRs, which include a range of electronic CCRs (eCCRs) and manual CCRs (mCCRs). Tec 60 CCR develops the understanding and skills for diagnosing life-support problems while using trimix/heliox to complete a technical dive with its necessary decompression obligations.

Prerequisites:
- Tec 40 CCR Diver or other qualifying certification
- Proof of 150 logged dives, with at least 25 dives and 50 hours experience with the Type T CCR used in the course with an offboard bailout system following Tec 40 CCR Diver principles. At least 10 of these dives must be deeper than 30 metres/100 feet.
- 18 years old

Tec 60 CCR Qualifier program
Due to differences between CCRs, divers qualify on each CCR. However, once qualified, if you wish to cross over to another Type T CCR, you'll only need to complete the Tec CCR Qualifier program, which covers unit-specific skills and knowledge.

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 Tec 100 CCR Diver

Tec 100 CCR Diver

Tec 100 CCR Diver is at the top of the PADI Tec CCR diver training. In this course, you’ll learn to plan and make hypoxic trimix/heliox dives using a Type T (technical) CCR to a maximum of depth of 100 metres/328 feet, carry and manage multiple bailout cylinders and complete multiple decompression stops.

The Tec 100 CCR Diver course addresses technical diving with Type T CCRs, which include a range of electronic CCRs (eCCRs) and manual CCRs (mCCRs). Tec 100 CCR Diver refines your ability to diagnose, understand and effectively respond to life-support problems. In the course, you will use hypoxic trimix/heliox diluent to complete a technical dive, with its necessary decompression obligations, while carrying a range of high/low oxygen and trimix/heliox bailout cylinders.

This training is significantly more challenging than the Tec 60 CCR Diver course in part because it includes the use of diluents and bailout gases you cannot safely breathe at the surface. Successful Tec 100 CCR Diver course completion requires divers to demonstrate the superior level of skill necessary to competently dive a technical CCR at exploration depths.

Prerequisites:

  • Tec 60 CCR Diver course certification (or qualifying certification from another organization).
  • Proof of 175 logged dives, with at least 50 dives and 100 hours experience diving the Type T CCR used in the course with off board bailout systems. At least 25 of these dives must be multistop decompression dives deeper than 40 metres/130 feet with trimix/heliox diluent.
  • 18 years of age.

Tec 100 CCR Qualifier Program 
Divers wishing to apply their certification to another Type T CCR at the Tec 100 CCR Diver level will need to complete the Tec CCR Qualifier program, which covers skills and knowledge specific to the particular unit.

Tec 100 CCR Refresher 
This refresher program covers the level of skills required to make Tec 100 CCR dives. Divers may also refresh skills appropriate for the Tec 40 and 60 CCR Diver courses as well, if required.

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 Tec Sidemount

 Tec Sidemount Diver Course 

Tec Sidemount offers the same benefits as the PADI Sidemount Diver course but gives you the opportunity to dive with 2+ cylinders for extended dive times. 

The Tec Sidemount Diver course is a great way to get started into technical diving because the skills you learn in this course will train you to handle multiple cylinders on a single dive. You can combine what you learn in the Tec Sidemount Diver course with other open-circuit tec courses that you take, or certifications you’ve already earned, to take advantage of sidemount’s cylinder configuration and handling advantages.  

Prerequisites:  
     - Be certified as a PADI Advanced Open Water Diveror have a qualifying certification from another training organization 
     - Have logged 30 or more dives
     - At least 18 years old 
     - Certification as a PADI Enriched Air Diveris recommended

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 Divemaster

Divemasters Wanted! Join the Tribe!

Do you have a deep and abiding passion for diving? Or, do you merely love it with all of your heart?  If so, you should consider doing what you love for a living: become a PADI Divemaster.

When you Join the Tribe™ by becoming a PADI Divemaster, you align yourself with the largest and most respected dive tribe in the world—that of PADI Professionals. These are PADI Divemasters and Instructors sharing a passion for diving and an active concern for the health of the world’s underwater habitats.  

PADI Divemaster Course

Looking for the first step in working with scuba as a career? Your adventure into the professional levels of recreational scuba diving begins with the PADI Divemaster program. Working closely with a PADI Instructor, in this program you expand your dive knowledge and hone your skills to the professional level. PADI Divemaster training develops your leadership abilities, qualifying you to supervise dive activities and assist instructors with student divers. PADI Divemaster is the prerequisite certification for both the PADI Assistant Instructor and PADI Open Water Scuba Instructor certifications.

What You Learn

During the PADI Divemaster program, you learn dive leadership skills through both classroom and independent study. You complete water skills and stamina exercises, as well as training exercises that stretch your ability to organize and solve problems as well as help others improve their scuba. You put this knowledge into action through a structured internship or series of practical training exercises.

As you progress through your Divemaster course, you’ll expand your diving knowledge, hone you skills and increase your confidence. Then, as a PADI Divemaster, you’ll use these attributes to lead, mentor and motivate other divers and experience the joy of seeing them transformed by the majesty of the the acquatic realm.

What You Can Teach

After becoming certified as a PADI Divemaster you will be authorized to:

  • Supervise both training and non-training-related activities by planning, organizing and directing dives
  • Assist a PADI Instructor during the training sessions for any PADI Diver course
  • Conduct the PADI Skin Diver course and PADI Discover Snorkeling program
  • Conduct the PADI Discover Local Diving experience
  • Conduct the PADI Scuba Review program
  • If qualified as a Discover Scuba Diving Leader, independently conduct the PADI Discover Scuba Diving program.
  • Earn the PADI Digital Underwater Photographer Specialty Instructor rating to be able to teach the PADI Digital Underwater Photographer specialty.
  • Independently guide Open Water Diver course students on the tour portion of Open Water Diver course Training Dives 2, 3 and 4 at a ratio of two student divers per certified divemaster.
  • Accompany Open Water Diver students under the indirect supervision of a PADI Instructor during:
    • surface swims to and from the entry/exit point and during navigational exercises
    • when the instructor conducts a skill, such as an ascent or descent, a Divemaster can remain with other student divers (with an individual student or buddy team)
  • Accompany student divers during Adventure Dives or Specialty training dives under the indirect supervision of a PADI Instructor.
  • Conduct the PADI Seal Team Skin Diver Specialist AquaMission
  • Conduct subsequent dives under an instructor’s indirect supervision for Discover Scuba Diving participants after participants have satisfactorily completed the first dive with a PADI Instructor.
  • Teach Emergency First Response courses after successfully completing an Emergency First Response Instructor course.

At a glance, compare what you can teach when you continue your professional diver education.

The Scuba Gear You Use

  • You use all the basic scuba equipment and some scuba accessories such as a dive slate, dive knife, compass, dive watch, etc.
  • It is highly recommended that you own all of your own scuba equipment, as familiarity with personal gear improves general scuba diving skills. You can find most everything at your local dive shop

 The Learning Materials You Need

The PADI Divemaster crewpak includes: 

  • PADI Divemaster Manual
  • Divemaster slates
  • PADI Instructor Manual
  • The Encyclopedia of Recreational Diving - a comprehensive overview of diving physics, physiology, and equipment
  • Scuba Tune-up Guidebook
  • PADI Professional Log
  • DSD Cue Cards
  • PADI Pro Bag
  • PADI Divemaster Application package

 There are other required materials that a Divemaster Candidate will need but may have received them during other PADI programs so they have not been included in the Divemaster Crew-Pak.  Please ask your PADI Instructor for the full list of required materials that you will need for the program.   

 You also have the option to take Divemaster Online and purchase the Divemaster eLearning Crew-Pak.

To purchase Crew-Paks, contact your local PADI Five Star IDC Dive Shop or Resort.  For Divemaster Online, you can sign up today.

Prerequisites

To take this course, you must be:

  • 18 years old
  • A PADI Advanced Open Water Diver (or qualifying certification from another training organization)
  • A PADI Rescue Diver (or qualifying certification from another training organization)
  • An Emergency First Response Primary and Secondary Care (or qualifying first aid and CPR training from another organization) course completion within the past 24 months.
  • Have at least 40 dives to begin the course and 60 for certification
  • Be fit for diving and submit a Medical Statement (PDF) signed by a physician within the last 12 months.

Other Courses That Will Prepare You for Success as a PADI Divemaster

Here are some suggestions for other PADI courses that will help make you more successful as a PADI Divemaster:

  •  Search and Recovery (Highly recommended)
  • Deep Diver (Highly recommended)
  • Dive Theory Online
  • Boat Diver
  • Coral Reef Conservation
  • Digital Underwater Photographer
  • Emergency First Response Instructor
  • Emergency Oxygen Provider
  • Enriched Air Diver (You can even sign up for the PADI Enriched Air Course Online!)
  • Equipment Specialist
  • Night Diver
  • Peak Performance Buoyancy
  • Underwater Naturalist
  • Underwater Navigation

Get College Credit

You may be able to earn college credit for the PADI Divemaster course.

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 Assistant Instructor

The PADI Assistant Instructor course

As a PADI Assistant Instructor, you not only gain additional experience as a PADI Professional scuba diver, but you also start learning the PADI System of diver education. You can act as an instructional scuba assistant and assume limited teaching responsibilities. It’s a great way to gain experience in order to become a scuba instructor!

The PADI Assistant Instructor Course can be conducted by all Five Star Dive Shops and Resorts and Five Star Instructor Development Centers and Resorts.  To find the one closest to you, please visit our Dive Shop Locator.

The PADI Assistant Instructor course is the first portion of the PADI Instructor Development Course (IDC) and when followed by the Open Water Scuba Instructor course (OWSI) and successful performance at the Instructor Examination (IE), leads to certification as a PADI Open Water Scuba Instructor.

The Fun Part

Get mentored while gaining hands-on experience teaching students.

Get College Credit

You may be able to earn college credit for the PADI Assistant Instructor course. 

What You Learn

You build upon your abilities to organize and supervise scuba diving activities, while concentrating on developing teaching skills. You learn through:

  • Knowledge development through self-study, quizzes, lectures and presentations
  • Confined water skill review and assessment, workshops and presentations
  • Open water workshops, rescue assessment and candidate presentations

The PADI Assistant Instructor Course consists of these sections:

  • Module 1: Academic Training
        · PADI Discover Scuba Diving and Snorkeling Programs
        · Developing Knowledge Development Presentations
        · Teaching Project AWARE and Peak Performance Buoyancy Specialties
        · Teaching in Confined Water
        · Conducting Open Water Training Presentations
  • Module 2: Independent Study
        · Knowledge Development
  • Module 3: Practical Application
        · Confined Water and Open Water Teaching Presentations
        · Standards Exam
        · Dive Rescue Skills Assessment

What You Can Teach

In addition to the responsibilities and duties you already have as a PADI Divemaster, as a PADI Assistant Instructor you can:

  • Teach academic presentations under the indirect supervision of a PADI Instructor 
  • During confined water dives, present initial skills training under the direct
  • supervision of a PADI Instructor 
  • Evaluate Open Water Diver surface skills under the indirect supervision of a PADI Instructor 
  • Teach and certify  PADI Peak Performance Buoyancy Specialty Divers under the direction of a PADI Instructor
  • Teach Project AWARE Specialty courses
  • Teach the AWARE Coral Reef Conservation specialty course
  • Conduct PADI Discover Scuba Diving experiences in a pool or confined water
  • Conduct PADI Seal Team AquaMissions
  • Teach PADI Digital Underwater Photographer specialty courses under the direction of a PADI Instructor after earning the PADI Digital Underwater Photographer Specialty Instructor rating

At a glance, compare what you can teachwhen you continue your professional diver education.

The Scuba Gear You Use

You use all the basic scuba equipment and some scuba accessories such as a dive slate, dive knife, compass, dive watch, etc.

It is highly recommended that you own all of your own scuba equipment, as familiarity with personal gear improves general scuba diving skills. You can find most everything at your local dive shop 

The Learning Materials You Need

The PADI IDC crewpak includes all the materials needed to prepare for a PADI Assistant Instructor or Open Water Scuba Instructor course. The 23-item pack includes:

  • Instructor cue cards for PADI’s core courses (OW, AOW, Rescue and Divemaster)
  • IDC Candidate Workbook and related reference materials,
  • Lesson planning slates for confined and open water
  • Quiz and exam booklets for the core courses
  • Specialty outlines for Project AWARE
  • PADI Instructor Manual.

To purchase this product, contact your local PADI Five Star Dive Shop or Resort. 

Prerequisites

You must

  • Be a PADI Divemaster or qualifying certification from another certification organization
  • Be at least 18 years old
  • Have 60 logged dives, including night, deep, and navigation dives
  • Have been a certified diver for at least 6 months
  • Have CPR and First Aid Training within the last 24 months
  • Be fit for diving and submit a Medical Statement (PDF) signed by a physician within the last 12 months
  • Want a fun and exciting career!

If you are looking for information on where to go pro, please contact your PADI Instructor Development Center or Career Development Center or Resort and sign-up today.

Your Next Adventure

Take the full Instructor Development Course to become a PADI Open Water Scuba Instructorso you can teach and certify PADI Open Water Divers.

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 Open Water Scuba Instructor

PADI Open Water Scuba Instructor Course

Are you looking for something extraordinary? To do something others can only dream of? To help people transform their lives? To open doors you didn’t even know existed? All of this, and more, awaits you as a PADI Open Water Scuba Instructor.

View the Instructor Development Calendar 

The Open Water Scuba Instructor (OWSI) program is one of two distinct components of PADI’s Instructor Development Course (IDC)—the core of PADI Instructor training. The first portion is the Assistant Instructor course followed by the Open Water Scuba Instructor program.

The OWSI program is a minimum of four days. It introduces you to the entire PADI System of diver education and concentrates on further developing your abilities as a professional dive educator.

The Fun Part

It’s about life transformations—both yours and those around you.

The fun part of instructor training is interacting with course participants while creating friendships that continue long after the course concludes.

You’ll begin networking with other professionals and begin to explore PADI Pro Diving Jobs worldwide. You’ll also have the opportunity to continue your professional education by participating in specialty instructor courses, which train you to teach specialties after instructor certification.

The Challenging Part

The challenging part of this course is your personal commitment to the training. The course requires you to complete all the self-study Knowledge Reviews before the course begins and to prepare daily assignments for teaching presentations daily. Organization and dedication are key.

What You Learn

During the course you’ll learn how to apply the PADI System of Education by presenting at least

  • Two confined water teaching presentations
  • Two knowledge development presentations
  • One open water teaching presentations integrating two skills

You will also attend and participate in the following 14 curriculum presentations:

  • Course Orientation
  • Dive Industry Overview
  • General Standards and Procedures
  • The Role of Media and Prescriptive Teaching
  • Legal Responsibility and Risk Management
  • PADI Scuba Diver and Open Water Diver Course
  • Adaptive Teaching
  • The PADI Continuing Education Philosophy
  • Business Principles for the Dive Instructor
  • Adventures in Diving Program
  • Specialty Diver Courses and Master Scuba Diver Program
  • Rescue Diver Course
  • Divemaster Course
  • Diver Retention Programs
  • How to Teach the RDP (Instructors from recreational diver training organizations other than PADI must complete.)

You will demonstrate competence at

  • performing all 20 dive skills listed on the Skill Evaluation.
  • performing a facedown, nonstop swim for 800 metres/yards using a mask, snorkel and fins.

During the course you’ll need to demonstrate competency in Dive theory by passing a five-part theory exam scoring 75% on each part .

What You Can Teach

After becoming an Open Water Scuba Instructor, you will be able to conduct the entire range of PADI programs from Discover Scuba Diving up to Divemaster. You may also choose to acquire specialty instructor ratings in areas of interest, such as Digital Underwater Photographer or Enriched Air Diver.

At a glance, compare what you can teach when you continue your professional diver education.

The Scuba Gear You Use

You will need to equip yourself with all the basic scuba gear as well as two scuba signaling devices —one audible and one visual.

Check with your local dive shop to purchase equipment needed for the course.

The Learning Materials You Need

The PADI Instructor Development Course crewpak includes all the materials needed to prepare for the Instructor Development Course. The 23-item pack includes:

  • Instructor cue cards for PADI’s core courses (Open Water and Advanced, Rescue and Divemaster)
  • Instructor Development Course Candidate Workbook and related reference materials,
  • Lesson planning slates for confined and open water
  • Quiz and exam booklets for the core courses
  • Specialty outlines for Project AWARE
  • PADI Instructor Manual

To purchase this product, contact your local PADI Five Star Instructor Development Course Dive Shop or Resort. 

Next Steps

View the Instructor Examination (IE) Calendar

Prerequisites

To qualify for training as a PADI Open Water Scuba Instructor, you must:

  • Be certified as a PADI Divemaster or a PADI Assistant Instructor or be an instructor in good standing with another training organization for at least six months (check with a PADI Course Director or Contact Us for qualifying credentials.)
  • Be certified as an Emergency First Response Instructor 
  • Be at least 18 years old
  • Be certified as a diver for at least six months
  • Have 60 logged dives that include experience in night, deep and navigation diving to participate in the Instructor Development Course. You’ll need 100 logged dives to take the Instructor Exams
  • Have proof of CPR and First Aid training within the last 24 months. The Emergency First Response course meets this requirement
  • Be fit for diving and submit a Medical Statement (PDF) signed by a physician within the last 12 months

If you are looking for information on where to go pro, please contact your PADI Instructor Development Center or Career Development Center and sign-up today!

Your Next Adventure:

You’ll want to continue your professional training by completing courses that allow you to teach beyond the core courses. For example, Emergency Oxygen Provider Instructor, Emergency First Response Instructor, and specialty instructor courses complement your Open Water Scuba Instructor rating and add to your professional portfolio.

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 Specialty Instructor

The PADI Specialty Instructor Course

Dive more, have more fun and teach about your favorite subjects.

Specialty instructor courses provide valuable teaching tips for meeting the requirements of the course.
You can choose from any of the 27 standard specialty courses that PADI offers along with distinctive specialty courses your Course Director may offer. Having five specialty instructor ratings is a prerequisite for the Master Scuba Diver Trainer (MSDT) rating.

Browse the most popular instructor specialties.

Don’t see a specialty on a subject that interests you? Write your own specialty! It’s easy and it gets you teaching scuba divers about things you like.

The Fun Part

Whether it’s Ice, Deep, Photography, Enriched Air Nitrox or one of your own, PADI Specialty Instructors are out there scuba diving and training. Join the fun.

  • As a PADI Specialty Instructor, challenge your students to become Master Scuba Divers 
  • Increase your marketability as a PADI Professional

What You Learn

You're on your way to becoming a PADI Master Scuba Diver Trainer with only five PADI Specialty Instructor ratings

You have three ways to become a PADI Specialty Instructor:

1.With a Course Director
2.Use your experience to apply directly to PADI
3.Write your own outline

Doing Specialty Instructor with a PADI Course Director

Apply for Specialty Instructor Rating directly to PADI

  • 10 experience dives in each particular specialty
  • Minimum number of certification not required 
  • 20 experience dives in each particular specialty
  • Have certified at least 25 divers before applying 

Specialty Instructor Training course attendance is highly recommended. These courses provide valuable hands-on training, technique demonstrations, course marketing information, current PADI Standards information and, when applicable, instructor-level open water training.   

What You Can Teach

Teach the PADI Specialties you like most!

At a glance, compare what you can teach when you continue your professional diver education.  

The Scuba Gear You Use

You will need to equip yourself with all the basic scuba gear, some scuba accessories and depending on which specialties you teach, you’ll need other specialty diving gear such as dive lights or underwater photography equipment. You can find most everything at your local dive shop 

Learning Materials You Need

PADI’s Specialty Instructor Manual (product no. 70250) includes the specialty instructor guides for all of PADI’s standardized specialties. The outlines are also available digitally on the Specialty Instructor Manual CD-ROM (product no. 70909MUL). Once registered, the digital specialty manual can be updated for a discounted price.

To purchase this product, contact your local PADI Five Star IDC Dive Shop or Resort. 

Prerequisites

You must be a

  • Renewed PADI Assistant Instructor, PADI Instructor or have completed an IDC or Open Water Scuba Instructor (OWSI)  program within the past 12 month.

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 Master Scuba Diver Trainer

The PADI Master Scuba Diver Trainer Course

You tell your students to aim for PADI Master Scuba Diver. You also want to tell them that you can take them all the way there because you’re a PADI Master Scuba Diver Trainer (MSDT).

The Fun Part

The Master Scuba Diver Trainer rating sets you apart from other dive instructors by showing your commitment to continuing your dive training and being prepared to help others continue their training as well. You also get to teach specialty diver courses – which opens the door to lots of fun while working.

What You Learn

You’re a new instructor? Just finished the IE? No problem. See your Course Director for PADI Specialty Instructor Training and the Master Scuba Diver Trainer Prep Course.

As a PADI MSDT, you demonstrate to a dive employer that you have good experience in teaching diving and also can teach a range of specialty diver courses. This makes a dive center or resort more likely to offer you a position.

What You Can Teach

As a PADI Master Scuba Diver Trainer, you

  • Teach the specialties you love to teach
  • Enjoy watching your student divers excel as you lead them from PADI Open Water Diver to PADI Master Scuba Diver 
  • Increase your income with multiple level training
  • Meet one of the requirements to qualify as a PADI Master Instructor 

At a glance, compare what you can teach when you continue your professional diver education.

The Scuba Gear You Use

You will need to equip yourself with all the basic scuba gear as well as some scuba accessories.

It is highly recommended and expected that, as a diver of this level, you own your own scuba equipment. You can find most everything at your local dive shop 

Prerequisites

  • To qualify as a PADI Master Scuba Diver Trainer, you must
  • Be a PADI Open Water Scuba Instructor 
  • Have five PADI Specialty Instructor certifications
  • Have certified at least 25 PADI Divers

If you’re considering entering the realm of technical dive instruction, then the MSDT will be useful. You must be a MSDT to become an instructor in Tec 50 Diver or the DSAT Trimix Diver courses.

If you are looking for information on where to go pro, please contact your PADI Instructor Development Center or Career Development Center and sign-up today.

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 Master Instructor

The PADI Master Instructor Rating

Be recognized as one of the elite dive educators – PADI Master Instructor. PADI Master Instructors embody the essence of a true dive professional having demonstrated a thorough understanding of the PADI System of diver education, and put it into practice by training 150 or more PADI Divers. They are dive industry leaders who help to shape the development of future dive courses.

The Fun Part

The PADI Master Instructor rating is unique in the PADI System – it is the one rating that you do not earn through training. You earn it by exemplifying what it means to be a PADI Instructor in what you do.

Prerequisites

You must be

  • A renewed, teaching status IDC Staff Instructor.
  • A PADI Open Water Scuba Instructor for at least two years.
  • A current Emergency First Response Instructor.
  • Have certified at least 150 PADI Divers, of which: 
       · At least 50 of the certifications must be for PADI Adventure Diver or higher.
       · At least 15 of the certifications for PADI Specialty Diver.
       · At least 5 for PADI Rescue Diver.
       · At least 5  for PADI Divemaster.
       · At least 5 for PADI Assistant Instructor.
       · No more than 75 of the 150 certifications may be from credits earned for conducting Discover Scuba Diving experiences.
       · No more than 50 of the 150 certifications may be from credits earned for staffing IDCs.
       · No more than 25 of the 150 certifications may be from non-diving specialty certifications. (i.e. Equipment Specialist, Project AWARE Specialist, etc.).
       · No more than 10 of the 150 certifications may be from PADI Seal Team or Master Seal Team registrations.
       · Have trained at least 10 students through the Emergency First Response program.
  • Possess a complete understanding of the PADI System of diver education.
  • Have participated in at least three PADI Instructor Development Seminars.
  • Use the complete PADI System of diver education including all appropriate PADI training materials when conducting PADI programs.
  • Issue PADI as the primary certification, and conduct all PADI certification courses and experience programs using methods consistent with PADI Standards and philosophy as outlined in the PADI Instructor Manual.
  • Have no verified Quality Assurance violations within the past six months and no open quality assurance inquiries in progress. (A member in review status may not qualify for Master Instructor until the Review status is lifted.)
  • Demonstrate support of the PADI organization in its efforts to establish programs in aquatic education and conservation.

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 Tec Instructor

Tec Instructor

If you’re serious about becoming a technical instructor and joining the ranks of PADI technical instructors, the Tec Diver Instructor course is an obvious choice.

What You'll Learn

The PADI Tec Instructor course incorporates instructional philosophies and course goals that directly address the demanding and challenging nature of technical diving instruction.

The PADI Tec Instructor course prepares candidates to conduct the Tec 40 course and addresses the philosophy, organization, practical considerations, promotion and other aspects of teaching the Tec 40 course.

What You Can Teach

As a Tec Instructor, you’ll be qualified to:

  • Teach and certify students up to Tec 40 
  • Assist full Tec Deep Instructors during the Tec 45 course

The Scuba Gear You'll Use

You use technical scuba gear, which typically uses two to four or five regulators,  a dive computer, and some accessories 

Learning Materials You'll Need

Available products for the Tec-Deep Instructor:

  • Tec Deep Lesson Guides CD-Rom (product no. 70838)
  • Tec Deep Instructor Guide (product no. 70407)
  • Tec Deep Instructor Cue Cards (product no. 60204)

To purchase these products, contact your local PADI Five Star IDC Dive Shop or Resort 

Prerequisites

To enroll in this course, you must

  • Be a renewed PADI Open Water Scuba Instructor (or a PADI Instructor with a higher rating)
  • Be a PADI Enriched Air Diver (or hold a qualifying certification from another organization)
  • Be a PADI Enriched Air Instructor, or have successfully completed a PADI Enriched Air Instructor Training course.
  • Be a PADI Deep Diver Specialty Instructor or have successfully completed a PADI Deep Diver Speicalty Instructor Training course.
  • Have a minimum of 100 logged dives where at least 20 dives were made with enriched air nitrox, 25 dives were deeper than 18 metres/ 60 feet and at least 15 dives were deeper than 30 metres/ 100 feet.

Note that Tec 40is not required.  If you are not certified as a Tec 40Diver (or have a qualifying certification from another training organization), then the Tec 40Instructor training course must include the entire Tec 40Diver course.

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 Tec Deep Instructor

The Tec Deep Instructor Course

If you’re serious about becoming a technical instructor and joining the ranks of PADI technical instructors, the Tec Deep Diver Instructor course is an obvious choice.

The Fun Part

Teach others how to explore the mysteries of the deep.

What You Learn

The PADI Tec Deep Instructor course incorporates instructional philosophies and course goals that directly address the demanding and challenging nature of technical diving instruction.
The Tec Deep Instructor course prepares candidates to conduct the Tec Deep Diver course and addresses the philosophy, organization, practical considerations, promotion and other aspects of teaching the Tec Deep Diver course.

What You Can Teach

As a Tec Deep Instructor, you’ll be qualified to

- Conduct the Discover Tec experience 
- Teach the Tec 40 course
- Teach the Tec 45 course
- Teach the Tec 50 course

The Scuba Gear You'll Use

You use technical scuba gear, which typically uses two to four or five regulators,  a dive computer, and some accessories 

Learning Materials You'll Need

Available products for the Tec-Deep Instructor:

  • Tec Deep Lesson Guides CD-Rom (product no. 70838)
  • Tec Deep Instructor Guide (product no. 70407)
  • Tec Deep Instructor Cue Cards (product no. 60204)

To purchase these products, contact your local PADI Five Star IDC Dive Shop or Resort 

Prerequisites

To enroll in this course, you must

  • Be a renewed PADI Open Water Scuba Instructor (or a PADI Instructor with a higher rating)
  • Be a PADI Enriched Air Instructor, or have successfully completed a PADI Enriched Air Instructor Training course.
  • Be a PADI Deep Diver Specialty Instructor or have successfully completed a PADI Deep Diver Speicalty Instructor Training course.
  • Have a minimum of 100 logged dives where at least 20 dives were made with enriched air nitrox, 25 dives were deeper than 18 metres/ 60 feet and at least 15 dives were deeper than 30 metres/ 100 feet.

Note that PADI Tec Deep Diver is not required.  If you are not certified as a Tec Deep Diver (or equivalent), then the Tec Deep Instructor training course must include the entire Tec Deep Diver course.

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 Tec Gas Blender Instructor

The Tec Gas Blender Instructor Course

You may be certified to blend gas, but do you want to teach others to do it? If so, the PADI Gas Blender Instructor course is just what you’re looking for.

The PADI Gas Blender Instructor course is one of the most informative and comprehensive programs available, incorporating instructional philosophies and course goals that directly address the precise nature of gas blending.

The Fun Part

Teach others how to blend gas like Enriched Air Nitrox.

What You Learn

You’ll learn the principles and procedures for oxygen cleaning, oxygen service and oxygen compatible air. You’ll also learn how to conduct the PADI Gas Blender course.

What You Can Teach

Teach the PADI Gas Blender Course

The Scuba Gear You'll Use

You use technical scuba gear, which typically uses two to four or five regulators,  a dive computer, some accessories and most likely a dive light.

The Learning Materials You'll Need

Available products for the Gas Blender Instructor:

  • Gas Blender Instructor Guide CD-Rom (product no. 70850)
  • Gas Blender Instructor Guide (product no. 70411) 
  • To purchase these products, contact your local PADI Five Star IDC Dive Shop or Resort.

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 Tec Trimix Instructor

The Tec Trimix Instructor Course

Tec Deep Instructors provide the most comprehensive technical instruction available. If you are both a Tec Deep Instructor and Tec Trimix Diver, then the Tec Trimix Instructor trainer course is for you.

The Fun Part

Explore the outer edges of technical deep diving.

What You Learn

The PADI Trimix Diver Instructor course incorporates instructional philosophies and course goals that directly address the demanding and challenging nature of technical diving instruction with helium gas mixes.

What You Can Teach

As a Tec Trimix Instructor you'll be one of the elite who can teach the Tec Trimix Diver. During the course you'll learn how to teach diving at the cutting edge depth of 75 metres/247 feet to 91 metres/300 feet.

The Scuba Gear You'll Use

You use technical scuba gear, which typically uses two to four or five regulators,  a dive computer, and some accessories. You can locate most items at your local dive shop.

Additional equipment requirements include:

  • Double cylinders (minimum 12 l/70 cf each, with larger preferred) with isolator manifold
  • Primary and secondary regulators, one with two metre/seven foot hose (approx.) for gas sharing, and one with SPG
  • Stage/decompression cylinders with regulator, SPG, mounting hardware
    Stage/decompression cylinders with regulator, SPG, mounting hardware and proper labeling/markings. Two per diver will be required
  • Backup decompression cylinders as appropriate and required for the environment
  • BCD and harness – redundant buoyancy control is required (double bladder BCD or dry suit if suitable for weight of equipment worn)
  • Depth gauge/computer and backup depth gauge/computer
  • Dive watch and backup timing device
  • Trimix decompression information (tables/trimix computer) and backup decompression information
  • Exposure suit appropriate for environment and dive duration. (If students will use dry suits, they should be trained/experienced with their use in recreational and technical diving prior to using them for trimix training or diving.)
  • Argon dry suit inflation or other inflation system as needed (students should not inflate dry suit with trimix)
  • Weight system (if needed)
  • Jon line (if needed for current diving environments)
  • Inflatable signal tube
  • Reel
  • Lift bag (bright yellow or per local community practice preferred)
  • Dive knife / cutting device and backup
  • Slate
    Backup mask (optional)
  • Compass
  • Dive lights (optional)
  • Drift kit (if drift decompressing)

The Learning Materials You'll Need

Available products for the Tec Trimix Instructor:

  • Tec Trimix Lesson Guides CD-Rom (product no. 70864)
  • Tec Trimix Instructor Guide with binder (product no. 70430)
  • Tec Trimix Instructor Cue Cards (product no. 60401)

Prerequisites

To enroll in the PADI Tec Trimix Instructor Training course, you must

  • Be a renewed PADI Master Scuba Diver Trainer or higher level PADI Instructor
  • Be a PADI Tec Deep Instructor or have successfully completed the PADI Tec Deep Instructor Training Course including the instructor examinations.
  • Be certified as a PADI Tec Trimix Diver or have a qualifying full trimix certification from another agency. (Contact your PADI Office for information about qualifying certifications)
  • Have a minimum of 200 logged dives, with at leat 20 technical decompression dives requiring at least one stage/deco cylinder. Of these, at least 10 must have been made deeper than 40 metres/130 feet using trimix.

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 Tec Sidemount Instructor

Tec Sidemount Instructor 

Sidemount has caught on in both recreational and open-circuit tec diving as a popular alternative equipment configuration. As a Tec Sidemount Instructor, you can qualify divers to use sidemount so they can take any of the TecRec open-circuit tec courses using the configuration. You can also train divers to use sidemount within the limits of their current open-circuit TecRec certifications.

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 IDC Staff Instructor

The PADI IDC Staff Instructor Course

As a seasoned PADI Instructor, you have wisdom and experience to share with up-and-coming PADI leaders. And, you know that continuing your education never ends.

As an Instructor Development Course (IDC) Staff Instructor, you help bring up the next generation of PADI Instructors while gaining in-depth instructor-trainer knowledge. 

The Fun Part

Because IDC Staff Instructors are an integral part of the PADI Instructor Development Course  (IDC), you set the stage for moving on to PADI Course Director as you present topics in the IDC and help shape PADI Divemasters and Assistant Instructors into PADI Open Water Scuba Instructors

Many of dive center or resort management positions require this level of Instructor experience and training, making this an important step if you are considering a career in Dive Center or you want to open a dive shop or resort.

What You Learn

  • You become a master of instructor-level dive theory, knowledge development teaching presentations and confined water teaching presentations
  • You audit a complete IDC as a staff member rather than as a student

What You Can Teach

In addition to all the courses you can teach as a PADI Instructor can also:

  • Teach PADI Assistant Instructor courses.
  • Assist PADI Course Directors in conducting the PADI Instructor Development Course.
  • Assist PADI Course Directors in conducting instructor-level continuing education.

At a glance, compare what you can teach when you continue your professional diver education.

The Scuba Gear You Use

You use all the basic scuba equipment and some scuba accessories such as a dive slate, dive knife, compass, dive watch, etc.

It is highly recommended that you own all of your own scuba equipment, as familiarity with personal gear improves general scuba diving skills. You can find most everything at your local dive shop

Prerequisites

You must be

·         a PADI Master Scuba Diver Trainer certification

·         at least 18 years old

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 Course Director

Course Director Training Course

PADI Course Directors are instructor trainers who conduct PADI Instructor Development Courses and other instructor-level training. PADI Course Directors hold the highest and most respected professional rating in recreational scuba diving.  They are among the dive industry’s most influential opinion leaders and role models. Those who join this elite group of professionals pass through a stringent screening process that examines their experience and training just to get into the competitive and demanding Course Director Training Course (CDTC).

Get Credit

You may be able to earn college credit for the PADI Course Director Training Course.

What You Learn

During the PADI CDTC, you learn how to conduct PADI Instructor Development programs and gain experience in developing scuba educators. The PADI CDTC is conducted by PADI Office Staff.

What You Can Teach

After successful completion of the PADI CDTC you can teach the following PADI courses and  programs:

  • PADI Instructor Development Courses (IDCs) and PADI Open Water Scuba Instructor (OWSI) programs 
  • PADI IDC Staff Instructor courses
  • PADI Status Updates
  • After certification as a PADI Specialty instructor Trainer, you can also teach PADI Specialty Instructor Courses 

At a glance, compare what you can teachwhen you continue your professional diver education.

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 EFR Instructor

The Emergency First Response Instructor Course

CPR and first aid are important skills that in high demand. As an Emergency First Response Instructor, you can teach these skills to anyone.

The Fun Part

Teach CPR and first aid to others so they can be prepared for an emergency. 

Get College Credit

You may be able to earn college credit for the Emergency First Response Instructor Course. 

What You Learn

Gain experience in how to structure learning, the requirements of performance-based training and your role as the instructor in the learning environment for teaching CPR and first aid.

You also learn how to motivate students, evaluate student knowledge, present course content effectively, become proficient in developing students' hands-on skills practice sessions, and are taught how to present an effective scenario-based learning experience.

What You Can Teach

Learn how to conduct the Emergency First Response Primary Care (CPR) and Emergency First Response Secondary Care (first aid) courses.

You also learn to conduct the recommended Automated External Defibrillator (AED), emergency oxygen and conscious choking management skills.

At a glance, compare what you can teach when you continue your professional diver education.

Learning Materials You Need

The EFR Instructor Start-up kit (product no. 60215) includes a complete set of instructional materials for each of the EFR courses. The specially-priced pack includes:

  • Student manuals for Primary Secondary Care, Care for Children, and CPR/AED
  • Student DVDs for Primary Secondary Care, Care for Children, and CPR/AED
  • Instructor guides for Primary Secondary Care, Care for Children, and CPR/AED
  • Student exams for Primary Secondary Care and Care for Children
  • Bandage pack
  • Care-at-a-Glance Card
  • Marketing kit
  • Red EFR duffel bag

To purchase this product, contact your local PADI Five Star IDC Dive Shop or Resort. 

Prerequisites

You must

  • Have successfully completed a sanctioned course in adult and child/infant CPR and basic first aid within the past 24 months.
  • be at least 18 years old

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